Tag Archives: Tragedy

An event shakes the character’s world apart. Often coupled with Melancholy, but not mutually inclusive.

Attack on Titan – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Shingeki no Kyojin

 

Related: Attack on Titan Season 2

Attack on Titan OVA (side story)

Similar: Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress

Knights of Sidonia

Tokyo Ghoul

Claymore

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Fantasy Action Drama

Length: 25 episodes

 

Positives:

  • The sense of fear.
  • The world and atmosphere.
  • Interesting Titan lore and variety.
  • Incredible action rendered in gorgeous animation.
  • The music is great, from the opening to the tension theme.

Negatives:

  • Battle shounen tropes that slow the pace at inopportune moments.
  • Bland as raw potato protagonist.
  • Poor build-up to twists.
  • Several elements introduced and focused on long before relevance.
  • Poor job of conveying the city’s scope and distance between walls. (Creator doesn’t truly comprehend how big a 480 km radius covers.)

Attack on Titan is a story of fear. Humans live in a constant state of fear, fear of being consumed by Titans, giants that bang on the walls of humanity’s last bastion. One day, a new Colossal Titan appears and smashes through the wall, realising that fear. What an incredible premise – Pacific Rim gone medieval. With such an engaging hook, how can anyone avoid this for long?

And I must say, I am…disappointed.

AoT starts strong with the breach of the outer wall, throwing us straight into the gravity of humanity’s situation. However, after that first tense episode, the pace slows to a crawl as we watch Eren, his foster sister Mikasa, and friend Armin train to become Titan hunters. Wait, so what about the response to the breach? Eh, who cares? It’s more important that we meet a swarm of new characters that have no significance – reminiscent of Pacific Rim’s Chinese Jaeger. This would have been alright if the training weren’t so clichéd. To qualify for combat, recruits must learn to use the ‘Three-Dimensional Manoeuvrability Gear,’ a pneumatic system of firing cables to swing like Spiderman between buildings. The gear is cool. The training for it, not so much. Eren can’t balance properly and faces expulsion from the program. He trains his hardest, yet still fails, but guess what saves him in the end? His belt was faulty… Really? That’s it? The hard-arse drill instructor, a veteran, didn’t consider the fault on day one? And do you want to know why they did this? To show his skill because he maintained balance for some moments despite the fault. That’s right, in Naruto, kids face death to become true ninjas; in Full Metal Alchemist, kids risk their limbs to learn alchemy; in AoT, you have to balance on a bloody swing. Please…stop…the tension…it’s too much…oh no…

How did no one see these episodes and say, “This has no tension; we can do better.” Why not have a Titan, a small one, attack during training and Eren shows unconventional skill? And you want to know the irony of it all? Eren’s gear use is the least important of any character in the series.

This level of poor writing isn’t constant, interestingly enough. No, after the worthless training, once the action kicks in, it’s back to episode one’s quality. Tension, conflict, gruesome violence, creepy as hell manbaby Titans, deaths every few minutes, that animation as they fly around the Titans, all of it, it’s excellent. Then, of course, the drunken writer of the team wakes up to do his part again, and gives us the worst yet, episode ten. In the middle of one tense moment, we have to stop and endure a character’s inner monologue about the obviousness of the trouble they are in – for an entire episode. In a better show, this would take a couple of minutes, or better yet, the resolution would have clever back and forth with the cornered hero.

Once that episode buggers off, it’s great again. That is until the drunkard wakes up again! AoT is a violent anime set in a bleak world where children have no childhood, where the wealthy stomp on the poor even with humanity on the verge of extinction, and where courage is hard to find. Yet, despite this mature look at the world, the writers saw fit to inject trashy battle shounen tropes into the narrative. Take for example, Eren, a character who spends most of his screen time yelling about how much he wants to kill Titans; the rest of the time, he has an inner monologue stating the obvious. When a commander gives a rousing speech to rally the troops, Eren spends several minutes telling us how the commander gave a rousing speech and how determined the troops look. Thanks, Eren, we can already see that on their faces. This happens every few episodes.

There is a moment where a character is in a Titan’s mouth, holding it open, and rather than stab upwards to possibly escape, he must give some heroic speech before dinner. We expect these moments in battle anime – that’s the standard – but here, when they’re trying to convince us of the narrative’s seriousness, it doesn’t match the tone. Did they hire Toriyama or some other rubbish for a few scenes? This coupled with Eren’s stating the obvious gives the impression that the writers think the viewers are idiots – that five-year-old watching Dragon Ball Z who doesn’t know grass is green. Even when writing for a five-year-old one shouldn’t talk down to the audience.

Twists have the same error. Rather than trust the audience and give hints early to bring it all together in that ‘no way!’ moment, we watch several episodes with no clear goal. Then we have the twist, the initiation of the twist thread, and the explanation all at once. Imagine if in The Sixth Sense we’re never told that the kid sees ghosts, and at the end, the kid suddenly says, “I see ghosts and you’re a ghost. Twist!” Sure, it’s a surprising twist, but without something to start with, the red herrings, the diversions, there’s nothing to build on, leaving no impact in the twist.

Now, even with negatives taking up the majority of this review, I found AoT to be a good anime. The Shadow of the Colossus sense of scale, the spectacle, the production value, and the overall atmosphere are well worth your time. I focus on these negatives because they aren’t isolated; I can’t say that block is bad, as in Death Note; I can’t say Monster is slow to start, but once rolling, the issues are minor. No, here, the problems, these obvious problems are peppered throughout. The obviousness is what surprises me the most. A novice editor with a single look at the script would have spotted them.

These problems would likely go unmentioned in a lesser show, overshadowed by bigger issues; however, there is nothing impressive about an Olympian placing first in a high school race. Attack on Titan has such a strong premise and it nails the positives so well that the slightest flaws becoming glaring issues.

Art – Very High

The art and scope is probably what drew most people to Attack on Titan. Animation during action sequences is phenomenal and has raised the bar for future action series. However, a few scenes are panning stills, but these last mere seconds. Excellent atmospheric lighting.

Sound – High

Attack on Titan features some of the most hype-inducing music in anime, especially that first opening (don’t know why they bothered with a second). Operatic and orchestral for the most part. Great acting in both languages; the actors convey trauma and despair particularly well, though Eren is one-note in this aspect. Needed a better script to reach a higher tier of quality.

Story – Medium

The action, world, atmosphere, all great, but such a weak script, poor structuring, flat protagonist (several other dullards besides), and kiddy tropes prevent Attack on Titan from having the engagement it could have had.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Recommended – yes, even with its flaws – because of what it does right – fear and action. Future seasons could elevate Attack on Titan to an all-time great, but as it is, a superior clone has the window to snatch the crown before coronation.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Fluid AnimationGreat MusicGreat OP or ED SequenceHoly S***Riveting ActionStunning Art Quality

Negative:

DissapointingWeak End

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Cowboy Bebop – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Cowboy Bebop

 

Related: Cowboy Bebop: Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door (movie side story)

Similar: Gungrave

Black Lagoon

Trigun

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Science Fiction Action Adventure Comedy

Length: 24 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Great style in its deep world building and visuals.
  • Love the characters, especially Ed.
  • Groovy jazz and Wild West music.
  • Many great comedy moments.

Negatives:

  • Could do with more overarching plot and a deeper exploration of the main antagonist.

Ah, Cowboy Bebop, the old classic. This was the anime that cemented my interest in the genre. Before Bebop, I wasn’t considered an anime fan; enjoyed a few series, yes, but had no interest in the medium as a whole, as I did with video games. Cowboy Bebop made me ask the question ‘what else does anime have to offer?’

The story follows Spike, a Bruce Lee meets Hans Solo type, and Jet as they hunt bounties across the galaxy aboard the spaceship Bebop, a bucket of tin always in need of repairs using money they don’t have. The sexy Faye Valentine and Edward, thirteen-year-old hacker extraordinaire and all-round weirdo, soon join them. Oh, and Ein, the wonder corgi – cutest anime pet.

Set in the year 2071, Cowboy Bebop takes a realistic approach to the progress of humanity into a Wild West galaxy of space flight and bounty hunters. Humanity has settled on the likes of Mars and Venus with hyperspace gates making long distance travel a breeze. The artists paid attention to detail in every aspect of the world building. It’s cool to see the mechanics of ships – air brakes, flap controls, veneer thrusters – and I am a stickler for the inconsequential details such as people getting Venus sickness from the planet’s atmosphere or how advertising works in the future. This doesn’t lead to anything, but I appreciate when creators build their lore beyond the necessary. Bebop’s universe has it all – combat drugs, bar fights, truckers, gambling, future PETA terrorists, and a mockery of Yuri Gellar. Most importantly, none of this world building needs explanation; no character halts the narrative to explain to the audience how the world works. We see it for ourselves – amazing what visuals can do for storytelling, aye?

Bebop uses an episodic format, each episode hunting a new bounty head from smugglers to gangsters, but there are a couple of two-parters. While each episode is great, some comedy focused (the crew high on mushrooms was the best), the lack of an overarching story does reduce the episode-to-episode engagement, making this closer to a series of related short stories. Only five episodes have a direct link, where Spike’s past and the antagonist Vicious catch up to Spike. Vicious isn’t a particularly interesting villain, as we never learn his motivations or raison d’être, which is strange because the single-episode villains have much characterisation. He is threatening, though; I will give him that.

Cowboy Bebop is all about the characters. They are the heart of this show. It’s as if one took the Millennium Falcon with its crew, dropped the galactic war, and focused on the characters’ pasts and how they handle small adventures. I particularly enjoy Ed; she is weird as hell, feral, talks in the third person and hilarious. Bebop has plenty of humour, as a matter of fact, quick, snappy humour, unexpected at times. The three old men who appear in most episodes, no matter the remoteness of location, slay me every time with their whining about how hard they worked back in the day and how little they have to show for it.

Watching Cowboy Bebop again, seventeen years after release, its quality still amazes me. The industry took years to produce a series of this quality again. Regardless of how many newer series I prefer, this unique anime will always be something special.

Art – Very High

I cannot believe Cowboy Bebop is from 1998. The animation, the art, the design, the cinematography, the detail, everything looks fantastic. I don’t see how they could have done better without an exponential budget increase.

Sound – Very High

Cowboy Bebop was the anime series to demonstrate the possibilities of quality dubbing, far surpassing the original Japanese. Yoko Kanno, one of the best composers in anime, helmed the music and it is excellent – jazz, blues, drums, Western – is there anything she can’t do? The OP track is a personal favourite.

Story – High

The fun space adventures of the Bebop and its ragtag crew of interesting characters. I would have liked a concrete overarching story to tie everything together.

Overall Quality – Very High

Recommendation: Cowboy Bebop is a must watch for its quality and significance to the anime medium, though at this point, I would be surprised if there is anyone left who hasn’t seen this.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Fluid AnimationGreat MusicGreat OP or ED SequenceHilariousPositive Recommended English Voice TrackStellar Voice ActingStrong Lead CharactersStrong Support CharactersStunning Art Quality

Negative: None

Code Geass – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Code Geass: Hangyaku no Lelouch

 

Related: Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion R2 (season 2 – included in review)

Similar: Gankutsuou: The Count of Monte Cristo

Death Note

Gundam 00

Legend of the Galactic Heroes

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Supernatural Science Fiction Action Mecha

Length: 25 episodes (season 1), 25 episodes (season 2)

 

Positives:

  • Deep, intricate plot with many worthy players involved.
  • Strategic action and power plays.
  • Interesting powers.
  • A fantastic soundtrack that amps the action and tragedy equally.
  • Unforgiving.

Negatives:

  • Lacklustre resolution to the thread on Lelouch’s mother.
  • Some nonsense flip-flopping in season 2.

I watched Code Geass by accident. What, I accidentally watched fifty episodes of a show? Yes, more or less. I had acquired several anime from a friend and picked one at random start with, not knowing what any were about. Next thing I knew, it was the end of the next day. Code Geass is exactly my kind of story – anti-hero, small group versus a titan, unforgiving with its characters, and loaded with twists.

We follow Lelouch, an exiled Britannian prince seeking revenge against the Britannian Empire responsible for his mother’s death and crippling of his sister. He resides in Area 11, formerly Japan until Britannia striped the country of its power, resources, and culture. ‘Elevens,’ as the citizens are referred to, live beneath the boots of wealthy Britannians. A mysterious green-haired girl grants Lelouch the power of Geass, enabling mind control through eye contact once per target. Equipped with his newfound power, Lelouch dons the persona of Zero and takes command of the Japanese rebels against Britannia. What follows is a tale of cunning, lies, betrayal, and brutality.

The key, I find, to Code Geass’s success is in its unforgiving nature with the characters. We have a wide cast of characters from every angle of the conflict – rebels, Britannians, students, scientists, citizens rich and poor, foreign powers, etc. – and every single one of them is on the line. People die left and right, including many you expect to go the distance. Furthermore, both allies and enemies are worthy of their roles in the narrative. Lelouch is a smart tactician, and it would have been a dull affair indeed if his opponents were easy to defeat; no, in Code Geass the Britannians bring just as much cunning to the field. In particular, I enjoyed his chess-like battles against half-sister Princess Cornelia and Lelouch’s childhood friend Suzaku, who starts as a sanctimonious prick, one of my most hated character types, but like all great characters in Code Geass, there is more to him than that.

It’s a joy to watch Lelouch try to balance his life as a student, where a girl fancies him and he works on the student council, against his role as rebel leader without revealing his identity or power to anyone – the comic relief comes from school. Normally, I find the premise of high school teens fighting wars and such difficult to buy, but here they sell it by not forgetting the difficulties he would face. More than once, his actions as Zero have dire consequences on his Britannian classmates, which creates some excellent relationship conflict I didn’t expect.

That isn’t to say all is perfect in Code Geass. The strategic plays in battle aren’t as well illustrated as say Death Note (part one) and in the second season, there is some flip-flopping between allegiances akin to Pirates of the Caribbean 3’s nonsense where people switched sides every sneeze. The thread regarding Lelouch’s mother ends so poorly that despite being important to Lelouch, it has little effect on what follows or the ending.

Lastly, as a fan of mechs, I want to touch on their representation here. With studio Sunrise on production, one would expect Gundam-like mecha, but they actually try something different. Here, we have rollerblading, grappling hook wielding mechs with cockpits that jettison when in danger. I liked the urban-focused design in practicality and was a little disappointed when the more powerful mechs enter the scene, pushing too close to Gundam traits.

Code Geass has too many layers and elements for me to discuss in a reasonable review, but it all comes together in an anime I couldn’t stop watching. Just one more. Just one more. Just one more. Just one more. Just one more. JUST ONE MORE! Even for this review, watching a third time, I meant to finish a few per day while I worked on other reviews, but I ended up completing all episodes in three days. Was I commanded to watch all episodes…? The conflict, the tension keeps on rising, destruction and tragedy every step of the way.

Art – High

CLAMP lends its iconic character art to Code Geass (not as hyper stretched as xxxHOLiC) coupled with what studio Sunrise does best – mechs. Love the costume design, especially for the Britannians. Biggest complaint is with mouths appearing on the side of the face when in profile, which gets rather extreme at times. Also, why are there so many skirt wedgies in season two? Seriously, can’t un-see it anymore.

Sound – Very High

Excellent acting in both languages, though I prefer the English, as Lloyd the scientist, one of my favourite characters, has the wrong voice in Japanese. Watching Code Geass again, I was reminded of how great this soundtrack is – many perfect tracks to enhance the scene. Only OPs and EDs let audio down, not because they are bad, but because they are too cheerful. (Season one, second opening is atrocious, though – didn’t anyone tell her she couldn’t sing?)

Story – Very High

Code Geass manages to craft an intense, strategic plot of a forsaken prince seeking revenge against his father’s empire. A few missteps didn’t hinder my ultimate enjoyment, even if a couple of events were eye narrowing.

Overall Quality – Very High

Recommendation: A must watch. Be prepared for sleepless nights once you begin.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: 

Deep NarrativeExtensive Character DevelopmentGreat MusicHoly S***Phenomenal VillainRiveting ActionStellar Voice ActingStrategicStrong Lead CharactersStrong Support Characters

Negative: None

Rumbling Hearts – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kimi ga Nozomu Eien

 

Related: Rumbling Hearts: Next Season (alternative ending)

Akane Maniax (spin-off)

Similar: ef: A Tale of Memories

Clannad: After Story

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Drama Romance

Length: 14 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Superb, crushing drama.
  • Powerful and emotional acting.
  • Mature handling of relationships, sex, and consequences.
  • Lamentable music.

Negatives:

  • Visual aesthetic doesn’t match the drama.
  • The comic relief side story has no effect on the main plot.

Note: No trailer since I feel it gives away too much.

As a teen new to the medium, I had no expectations of serious drama without fantasy or science fiction since anime had teens as the core market. After watching what my friends had recommended, I went to a database for their highest rated anime and noticed Kimi ga Nozomu Eien (no dub at the time) towards the top, but with that art, I doubted its worth. I saw the visuals as a challenge – ‘Go ahead; I dare you to watch this cheesy-looking anime.’ I accepted.

The story starts in high school. Swim champ Mitsuki introduces her best friend Haruka to Takayuki, a guy in her class. Haruka, a shy and sweet girl, confesses to Takayuki and at first, he is hesitant, but does agree to date her to avoid hurting her feelings, for he is a well-meaning and good-natured guy. His thoughts stay with Mitsuki and hers with him. As time goes on, Takayuki develops feelings for Haruka and they grow intimate. So far, all was as I expected – sappy, a bit mushy, first-world teen problems. Then, everything comes crashing down when tragedy strikes.

This is where the teen romance dies, replaced by darkness and depression. We enter a narrative of broken dreams, missed opportunities and facing reality. Rumbling Hearts is harsh and cruel, as is life. I do not envy the soul crushing guilt felt by Takayuki, that all-consuming emotion capable of shutting down one’s life. Seriously, just punch me in the heart, why don’t you. Take my emotions and make them dance on glass while you’re at it.

The story spans a few years with the characters entered into the workforce, flashing back to high school on occasion. It’s great to see the juxtaposition between the happier past and sombre present. You may not like these characters. You may hate the selfishness, the cowardice, or the timidity, but that raw truth to the characters is what it means to be human, it’s what brings them to life and makes this more than a teen romance. This isn’t a series for those who like their heroes to be selfless paragons.

Furthermore, the mature approach to sex is refreshing. No ‘tee-hee-hee’ behind the hand, no ‘omg, he’s like, so hawt,’ and no pretending that sex is something only born of love. Relationships aren’t restrained in Rumbling Hearts.

Other than the dissonant art, my complaint is with the comedic side plot of Takayuki working at a restaurant with two waitresses, one rowdy and the other unfortunately roped into her antics. I understand that the audience needs moments to breathe amid the drama – I wouldn’t recommend a one evening binge – but the side thread has no effect on the core. With all restaurant scenes cut, Takayuki would simply need to infer that he works and nothing would be lost from the plot. Yes, the humour is decent, and yet I can’t imagine it being difficult to have a relevant and engaging thread instead. Of course, since these moments have no effect, they don’t weaken the drama either.

Don’t be fooled by the factory farmed visual novel aesthetic; Rumbling Hearts is a heavy drama that doesn’t hold anything back. I have kept several plot details hidden, ones you would likely find in other reviews, to avoid any spoilers so that you may experience it as I did. If only western TV had drama of this level for a young audience.

Note: Rumbling Hearts: Next Season is an alternate ending to the series. Despite two hours of content, Next Season has nothing of worth. Each episode focuses on a different character, but really, flashbacks to the series cover most of the screen time. However, the worst part is the alternate ending, as it decapitates all the effort and drama built up in the series. Next Season is what a bad version of Rumbling Hearts would look like.

Art – Medium

Rumbling Hearts is deceptive in its choice of art. Looking at a screenshot, you could be forgiven for confusing this with a dozen cheesy high school romances. This means the character detail is a little flat, mainly due to the single tone shading. The backgrounds are pretty. One could argue that the pleasant art increases dramatic impact through contrast.

Sound – High

The actors for Takayuki and Mitsuki deliver powerful performances in Japanese, my recommended track. Sorrowful piano enhances the emotion.

Story – High

A mature story of growth and facing tragedy filled with honest, human characters. Irrelevant comedy side plot, however.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Unless you hate depressing drama, Rumbling Hearts is a must watch. Prepare for the feels train. And remember, if you hate the characters’ choices, it’s okay.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Deep NarrativeExtensive Character DevelopmentStellar Voice ActingStrong Lead Characters

Negative: None

Basilisk – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Basilisk: Kouga Ninpou Chou

 

Similar: Ninja Scroll the Movie

Samurai X: Trust and Betrayal

Romeo x Juliet

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Dark Fantasy Action Adventure Romance

Length: 24 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Creative powers make for strategic encounters.
  • Both ninja clans have good and evil.
  • No character feels safe.
  • Tragedy of the premise makes you feel for the characters.

Negatives:

  • Some characters don’t get the development and screen time they deserve.
  • The English voice track doesn’t work well with Japanese nouns and honorifics.

Two ninja clans have feuded for the last four-hundred years, only held at bay by a royal pact prohibiting conflict in the last few generations. In this time of tenuous peace, Gennosuke, grandson of the Kouga clan leader, and Oboro, granddaughter of the Iga clan leader, have fallen in love and their marriage is to create a binding peace between the clans. However, the current shogun decides to use the clans to determine the successor from his two sons. Each clan must select its ten best ninja to annihilate each other. The winning clan will receive the support of the shogun for the next thousand years and rule over the defeated. The pact is broken.

Basilisk is a brutal story as both sides cut each other down to the last. You quickly learn that no one is safe in this conflict; no character wears unkillable ‘plot armour.’ This creates great tension in every moment of conflict, for you never know what will happen, who will die. Basilisk makes great use of the ninja theme with every aspect shrouded in deception and brutality. Each ninja has a special power such as a spider-man who spits glue-like phlegm, and a woman can use her blood to mark the target and create a red mist she can vanish into. To reveal any more would constitute spoilers since the powers themselves are kept hidden for use as twists in the plot. I love strategic use of character abilities and talents.

The writers did a great job with the characters. Neither clan is the good or bad side. Both have characters with shades of grey, beautiful and ugly, calm and angry, kind and cruel. Having these complex characters on both sides makes it all the harder to see them die.

It is clear Basilisk drew much inspiration from Ninja Scroll the Movie with the unique ninja powers and action style. In my review of Ninja Scroll, I noted the lack of character development as a core issue. Thankfully, Basilisk uses its longer screen time to develop the characters through flashbacks and during downtime. Even then, a few characters don’t get the screen time they deserve in such a large cast.

Basilisk excels at character design, each ninja’s look based on their powers – they even have a ninja with no arms or legs. The action is suitably gory and uncensored as a man cuts off his own head. I do wish the visual style in general had more grit like Ninja Scroll the Movie and BerserkBasilisk looks too clean by comparison.

Finally, we come to the audio. Don’t use the English track. With so many archaic Japanese names and locations coupled with honorifics –dono and –sama spoken in American accents (some rather heavy, see: character Okoi), the English voice work sounds strange. If they insisted on using the honorifics with these voices, they should have use titles like ‘lord’ and ‘lady’ instead. Stick to the Japanese original with its well-matched voices to the characters.

I highly recommend Basilisk to anyone who isn’t averse to a little gore. The ninjas and their powers make for an engaging narrative of action and tragedy.

Art – High

A variety of character designs that fit their creative powers. Gore and violence worthy of the brutal premise. I would have liked more grit in the general art.

Sound – High

In Japanese, each character has the right voice, well executed. In English, however, the heavy use of Japanese words doesn’t sound right. Outside of the forgettable title tracks, the music is nice. I particularly liked what I refer to as ‘mountain monk’ music (I have no idea what it’s called) – flutes, chimes, ethereal vocals, etc.

Story – High

A tragic tale of two ninja clans willing to fight to the last warrior if it means wiping out the opposing clan. Add in the forbidden romance, and you have a great story to hear.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Can’t go wrong watching this. Basilisk manages to deliver great action coupled with complex characters in a dark tale of love and hate.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Holy S***Phenomenal VillainRiveting ActionStrategic

Negative: None