Tag Archives: Pokemon

Pokémon: The Movie 2000 – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Pokémon: Maboroshi no Pokémon Lugia Bakutan

 

Related: Pokémon: The First Movie

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Action Adventure

Length: 1 hr. 20 min. movie

 

Positives:

  • The legendary Pokémon feel legendary.
  • High tension.

Negatives:

  • Most forgettable villain.
  • Romance between Ash and Misty?

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I had watched Pokémon: The Movie 2000 so many times as a child, even more than the Pokémon: The First Movie, that I lost count. It is perhaps third behind Disney’s The Aristocats and 101 Dalmatians for my most watched kids’ movies. It was a perfect storm of factors to make me love it. It was a Pokémon movie released at the height of my Pokémon mania, it featured Pokémon from Gold & Silver games, which are still my favourites, while also incorporating the legendary birds of the three elements at the centre, and gave it epic an scope to threaten the world. It’s as if Nintendo had asked little me what kind of Pokémon movie I wanted. It goes without saying, but I bloody loved this movie.

I hadn’t seen it in over a decade until I rewatched it for this review. So many memories came back to me, recalling a simpler time when I didn’t even know this was called anime, when I had no responsibilities and could waste time as though it wasn’t a limited resource. Fond memories.

Unfortunately, I doesn’t hold up as well as The First Movie. But before I get into why, let me cover the scenario in brief.

Lawrence, a man with more money than sense, likes to collect the rarest Pokémon in his gigantic flying fortress. On his crosshairs are the three legendary birds of ice, lightning, and fire – Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres – which, when disturbed according to the prophecy, will summon the ultimate prize: Lugia. Disturbance of these legendary birds results in climate change that Al Gore can only dream of and is the reason for Lugia’s awakening. Ash Ketchum and company find themselves washed into this conflict when a storm carries their boat off course. Only Lugia and “the chosen one” (spoiler: it’s Ash) can restore balance to the elements and save the world.

I’ll go over a few positives first. I like that no one takes the prophecy seriously at first, that it’s just a story for the tourists to add character to this holiday island they end up on. By the end, it isn’t even clear if the “chosen one” aspect of the prophecy was true or if Ash just happened to be in the right place at the right time to help. As mentioned before, I love the legendary birds and their world-ending conflict feels appropriate to hype they receive in Pokémon lore. Later legendaries would power creep them to the point where one Pokémon is the God and still not feel as cool. The tension is also high from the moment the first storm hits.

Where The Movie 2000 falls flat is in the villain. Think about how many times I have seen this movie and know that I still can’t remember any of Lawrence’s character (even forgot his name). He is utterly forgettable. You compare him to Mewtwo from the previous movie and it’s night and day. Mewtwo has a clear motivation, with reasoning, a complete arc, and memorable lines. Lawrence has nothing to recommend himself as the star villain of your movie. The only positive I can give is that he’s not from Team Rocket, which is something different.

When you have a villain who isn’t a personal threat to the protagonist, it weakens the villain-hero conflict, which you need to make up for in other areas. For instance, you can have more conflict between allies to heighten the emotional drama. Looking at the previous movie once more, Mewtwo threatened Ash’s Pokémon and made them fight to the death. Now that’s heavy conflict. This apocalyptic scenario, while a tense rollercoaster, requires no emotional investment from the heroes.

As a kid, you’re first priority in a movie is the cool factor and the fun factor. Who cares about baby stuff like emotions and drama? Pokémon: The Movie 2000 is certainly cool and fun, but as an adult, it no longer contains the factors I desire most.

Before I go, I want to touch on something I didn’t properly notice when I was but a wee lad. Did they try to push a romance between Ash and Misty? The story introduces a new girl who tells them the prophecy and teases Misty about her feelings for Ash. I never got that sense from the series. Perhaps this was a test ground. Either way, it isn’t particularly relevant nor affect enjoyment. It’s just odd.

Art – Medium

The art is a little better than The First Movie, except in the case of the CG fortress, though that isn’t a serious issue. I like the texture of the environments.

Sound – Medium

I have no comment on the Japanese. No matter what I do, I can’t get used to it. Meowth, as always, is the best. There is another cover song of the main theme like before.

Story – Medium

A storm will destroy the world unless Ash can restore balance between ice, lightning and fire with the aid of an ancient Pokémon. This is a fun Pokémon side adventure, albeit one that needs a better villain.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: For Pokémon fans only. Not only is this tailored to Pokémon fans, most references won’t make sense without prior knowledge.

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Pokémon: The First Movie – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Pokémon: Mewtwo no Gyakushuu

 

Related: Pokémon (main series)

Pokémon: Mewtwo Returns (sequel)

Pokémon: The Movie 2000 (next movie)

 

Watched in: English

Genre: Action Adventure

Length: 1 hr. 25 min. movie

 

Positives:

  • Mewtwo is a menacing villain.
  • Good moral lesson.
  • Team Rocket works better than in the series.

Negatives:

  • Production values aren’t movie quality.
  • Dated pop songs in the dub.

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The first soundtrack I ever owned was for Pokémon: The First Movie on cassette. It was all I played on my Sanyo Walkman for months. Listening to a particular song was a challenge, as I had to fast forward and guess when to stop. Nope, too early – still on ‘Don’t Say You Love Me’. Oops, too far. Screw it; let’s just go back to the Pokémon Theme. Only good song on the list anyway. (Man, I’m glad I live in the future.)

The release of Pokémon: The First Movie was a major event in the West. Pokémon was at the height of popularity with the trifecta of games, anime, and trading cards. We kids went nuts for a movie featuring Mew, the rarest Pokémon. Would we receive the adorable monster in game and in card from at last? (Spoiler: No. Nintendo hated us. Bastards.) To see Pokémon on the big screen was mind blowing to the child mind. What about all these years later, though?

You know what, it ain’t bad.

The story centres on Mewtwo, clone of the ancient Mew, believed to be the most powerful Pokémon. Breaking free from the shackles of his creator, Mewtwo seeks to prove his superiority over humankind and all Pokémon by inviting the best trainers to the ultimate challenge on his island. Of course, Ash Ketchum, who has actually never won anything meaningful in his Pokémon trainer career, receives an invitation – ‘cause protagonist. Little do he and the other trainers know that Mewtwo has sinister plans for their Pokémon.

The First Movie was refreshing at the time for having a plot with serious stakes – the end of the world and all natural Pokémon. The main series suffered from endless low-stakes episodes, usually undermined by Team Rocket. Ash had never faced a challenge. In fact, the series hated challenging him so much that in the Pokémon League, the final test for a trainer, he lost not because another trainer bested him, but because his Pokémon doesn’t listen. Super lame. The First Movie had weight, which holds up today.

It’s also great for fan service, bringing together most fan favourites such as Charizard, Venusaur, Blastoise, and Gyarados in one place for an epic battle. Let’s not forget Mewtwo, the star of the show. He is a great villain. You don’t expect a Pokémon villain to have good and bad qualities in conflict within himself as he seeks a purpose. And he delivers one of the deepest lines in history. (I hear Gandhi rose from his grave upon hearing Mewtwo’s words.)

Mew plays well off Mewtwo. I love how Mew cares so little for Mewtwo’s bravado, more interested in playing around like a cat distracted by yarn in the face of destruction.

Team Rocket is a pleasant surprise too. As funny as Team Rocket can be in small doses, having them appear every episode to derail the plot grew tedious. In The First Movie, they’re hilarious and complement the film rather than get in the way. Meowth has always been the best character and he has some great lines in this, and the fight against his clone is great. There’s something amusing about Meowth chatting with his clone while all around them Pokémon are stomping the life out of each other.

Pokémon: The First Movie won’t hold any interest if you aren’t a fan of the franchise. This is aptly described as the best episode of the original series rather than a standalone film. But if you do have any passing interest in the franchise, even if purely through the games, Pokémon: The First Movie is the perfect trip back to childhood.

Art – Medium

Though Pokémon: The First Movie looks much better than the series, it still barely reaches the standard for good anime visuals of the time.

Sound – Medium

I can’t watch Pokémon in anything but the dub – I don’t even know most names in Japanese. Meowth is always the best voice, but Mewtwo has the best dialogue this time. The soundtrack is mostly pop songs that haven’t aged after their populist inclusion in 1999. They don’t fit. At all.

Story – Medium

The ultimate Pokémon invites the best trainers to his island for a test of strength, where he can cement his dominion over mankind. Mewtwo’s villainy and the ultimate lesson of Pokémon: The First Movie make it one of the franchise’s best stories.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: A must for Pokémon fans. Even if you aren’t a Pokémon fan, The First Movie is an enjoyable ride down nostalgia lane.

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Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: None

Negative: None

Pokémon Origins – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Pocket Monsters: The Origin

 

Related: Pokémon (main series)

Pokémon: The First Movie

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Action Adventure

Length: 4 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Worthy tribute to the classic games.
  • Nothing like the main series.
  • Vibrant visuals and animation.
  • Modern renders of the game’s music.

Negatives:

  • A bit rushed.

I have a special loathing for the Pokémon anime series. I hate how that show squandered the premise with its repetitive nature that hasn’t gone anywhere in nearly nine hundred episodes. A proper Pokémon adventure with serious battles, serious conflict, and not the Jesse and James kind every episode, would be excellent. But no, we have to endure Ash, a character-less dweeb, as he fails endlessly at becoming a Pokémon master.

So, is Pokémon Origins the series I had been waiting for? Yes, but no. Its length, of course, limits the grand adventure I had in mind. Each episode focuses on key points in Pokémon Red & Blue, much of the adventure summarised in segments between events. If you haven’t played the games, these summaries won’t mean anything to you, as they give little context and blitz through them – Red earns two badges between episodes one and two, for example. That said, when the narrative does slow down enough for us to enjoy the details, Origins is a good anime.

We follow optimistic, yet naïve Pokémon noob Red on his quest to complete the Pokédex. (How Professor Oak, a guy with an empty Pokédex, is called the Pokémon Professor will always be beyond me.) He chooses Charmander while rival Blue (Green in Japanese to match their release. Also, not as much of a douche as Gary, though still arrogant) picks Squirtle.

My favourite element of Pokémon Origins is how close it sticks to the games. The music when he encounters a Pokémon or beats a gym leader is just like in the game, only not 8-bit. Furthermore, the Pokémon don’t say their own names, instead uttering animal noises. He receives HM01 Cut from the SS Anne captain, the bike ticket from the fan club president, and they even gamify several elements – a new game starts at the beginning and he saves at the end of each episode, Gameboy graphics and all. The only inaccuracy comes from mega evolutions. Naturally, all of this will mean nothing to those who don’t have a fondness for the games. Origins is very much a nostalgic throwback.

If you haven’t played Red or Blue, Origins is still a good introduction to the franchise, as it details the mechanics (according to the games), though does become a bit exposition heavy as a result. Don’t go on to the main series expecting quality, however.

Pokémon Origins accomplishes more in four episodes than the main series has in hundreds. If only they had created a full season, maybe several on this level.

Art – High

Much higher quality and animation than what is found in the main series – probably the best-looking Pokémon anime. The ability effects for fire, water, etc. in particular are great.

Sound – High

Better acting than the series in every way, and is good in either language (same team as Sword Art Online for English). Hearing the classic games’ music, used at the correct moments, floods me with nostalgia.

Story – Medium

A near-exact replication of the Red & Blue story from starter selection to facing Mewtwo after the championship. However, with only four episodes, most of the narrative is rushed in summaries.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: A must for fans of the games. If you haven’t played Pokémon Red or Blue (or Yellow), you are unlikely to get the full enjoyment out of Pokémon Origins.

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Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

CharmFluid Animation

Negative:

Poor Pacing