Tag Archives: Mobile Suit Gundam

Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kidou Senshi Gundam: The Origin

 

Related: Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin – Loum Arc (sequel)

Mobile Suit Gundam (original version)

Similar: Code Geass

Legend of the Galactic Heroes

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Mecha Science Fiction Action

Length: 4 episodes (1 hr. each)

 

Positives:

  • “Char” Aznable.
  • A Gundam protagonist that earns every step of his power.
  • Mix of politics, assassinations, and war.
  • No Gundam vagueness.

Negatives:

  • Ill-suited slapstick.
  • (Where is my next episode?)

(Request an anime for review here.)

Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin is pitched as a retelling of the series that started it all, Mobile Suit Gundam. Of course I would watch a remake of a classic I enjoyed. I thought we would open on Amuro, the original protagonist, so when it focused on a blond child called Casval and his little sister, I admit to my confusion. Where’s Amuro?

As it turns out, Gundam: The Origin starts before the original, at the inciting incident that led Char Aznable on the path to become such an enigmatic figure in the wars to come. I am hooked. Char is the most interesting character in Universal Century Gundam, so to see him as protagonist, with his backstory explored in depth, is a delight.

After a teaser of adult Char in a space battle, we return to him as a child on a space colony. His family’s high-class life shatters with the sudden death of his father, an advocate for Spacenoid (citizens of space colonies) independence. The father’s supporters smell foul play in this “natural” death and anarchy breaks loose on the streets. Everything is in disarray. Who’s in charge? Who’s allied with whom? What does each player in the game want? Answers are hard to find.

Char, his sister, and his mother are now valuable pieces in either inciting further action or quelling the riots. Life pushes them around. For Char, however, this isn’t a life worth living. He begins to plot a course towards revenge. Will he get revenge though? And on whom? With so many players in the game, his quest won’t be an easy one.

Gundam: The Origin is a good show in all aspects, but Char makes it great. As an anti-hero, we are never quite sure what he will do to achieve his goal. When he’s friendly with someone, we a never sure if he’s actually friends with them or up to something. Up to something – that’s a good way of summing up Char. He’s always up to something

Beyond him, Gundam: The Origin has an extensive cast, each with a purpose in this political maelstrom. Friends, enemies, or somewhere in between, you will meet all sorts. Barring some random slapstick, the cast feels written for an older audience than typical Gundam, which I suspect stems from having an older protagonist in Char. It’s a refreshing change, especially coupled with him earning power and skill through work rather than having it all thrown at him like other Gundam series (Unicorn) that I will not mention here (Unicorn).

The writing as a whole is leaps better than what I expect from a Universal Century series. Vague dialogue is nowhere in sight. No one stands in the open cockpit of a mech preparing to self-destruct while they spout some “cool” line instead of running clear. The conflict and political landscape is coherent (unless intentionally masked for story), free of the vague nonsense that plagues this franchise. There is no rambling on about the ‘dialogues’ to come, the ‘dialogues’ that will solve all, the bloody ‘dialogues’ that will answer the meaning of bloody life! No complaints about the writing from me this time.

And so, we reach my major gripe. Where is my next episode? I want more, damn it! You can’t just start the story, give me all this good writing, an amazing protagonist, political intrigue that makes me lean forward, and then just end it right there. What are you playing at, Sunrise?

If future Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin entries maintain this quality, it could very well earn a ‘Very High’ rating from me.

Art – High

The chaotic action scenes use CG for the mechs and ships, but it works well, as spaceships don’t need much work and the particle effects mask it well. Unlike the recent Berserk that has random camera movements, just because, Gundam: The Origin takes advantage of the CG with a dynamic camera that dives into the action. Everything else is clean.

Sound – High

Good voice work. The script is less wishy-washy than other Universal Century Gundam. When a character needs to say something, they say it.

Story – High

A retelling of the original Mobile Suit Gundam, but from before the start with the events that made Char the legend he has become. I expected another Gundam Unicorn; I got something great instead.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Watch it. Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin is a great place to start for newcomers to the gargantuan franchise, while also giving plenty to veterans.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Deep NarrativeStrong Lead Characters

Negative: None

Advertisements

Mobile Suit Gundam – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kidou Senshi Gundam

Note: commonly referred to as Mobile Suit Gundam 0079 to distinguish it from other Gundam series.

 

Related: Mobile Suit Zeta Gundam (sequel)

Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin (remake)

Mobile Suit Gundam: The 08th MS Team (side story)

Mobile Suit Gundam MS IGLOO: The Hidden One Year War (side story)

Mobile Suit Gundam Thunderbolt (side story)

Similar: Gundam SEED

Aldnoah.Zero

Legend of the Galactic Heroes

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Mecha Science Fiction Action Drama

Length: 43 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Surprisingly good.
  • A solid base for the franchise.
  • Great dub.

Negatives:

  • Art, audio, and some writing are noticeably old, if still charming.
  • Sudden psychics in the final act.
  • A tad long.

(Request an anime for review here.)

Mobile Suit Gundam doesn’t suck. That is the biggest surprise watching this progenitor of a genre. Considering Gundam anime got worse and worse the further I went back, I expected the original to be garbage. But Mobile Suit Gundam holds up for the most part.

Like the countless series that would follow, Mobile Suit Gundam starts with an attack. The Principality of Zeon broke away from the Earth Federation eight months ago, and the war has since fallen into a stalemate. However, everything changes when young Amuro finds Earth’s secret weapon – Gundam. He and a mismatched crew escape aboard the White Base spaceship and prepare to fight back against Zeon.

You can see the origins of many modern Gundam tropes here – villain with a mask, teen hero forced into war, special mech he can pilot, civilians swept up in the battles around the main ship on the run, conflict started over a weapon designed to end conflict, and many more. As a Gundam fan, I screamed, “That’s the same as the other show!” several times like a giddy schoolgirl.

Watching this after Gundam Unicorn, I realised what Unicorn was trying to do. Unicorn tried to recall the original series, not just in having similar plot points, but also in the characters. Hell, Unicorn’s white mask villain says he wants to invoke MSG’s white mask OG, Char. However, unlike Unicorn’s whiny protagonist, Amuro complains but with reason, and when it comes down to business, he delivers in the face of his problems. Whining waits until after the fight.

Furthermore, Amuro isn’t one sided. He recalls SEED’s Kira (or really, Kira recalled Amuro), where much of his conflict comes from within. He doesn’t enjoy war and killing, but must do so to keep loved ones alive, which garners engaging conflict. When Amuro preaches, someone counters his naïve argument. (There’s no Cagali – yay!)

MSG still has its problems, mind you. Amuro, despite being an engineer, not a soldier, can pilot the Gundam because the AI does most of the work. I’m still not sure why you wouldn’t couple the AI with a veteran pilot. A funny moment (probably unintentional) occurs when Amuro cracks out the paper Gundam manual for help as he’s plummeting towards Earth.

Dialogue also gets wordy at inopportune moments. “Do you really want to switch equipment mid-air while in this battle with enemies firing, is that what you are saying?” Don’t have time, lady! Characters also do too much “I’m talking to myself to make 100% sure the audience knows what my motivations are.” We can see – no need to tell.

MSG goes on a little long as well. It doesn’t have several threads like its contemporaries to maintain interest at such a length. The single track feels monotonous around the mid-point. The main ship fleeing enemy pursuit seems to go on forever, unlike SEED, which only did it for one act. The final act introduces mild psychic powers. While this trope has become a staple, it feels contrived here because it comes out of nowhere – later series built it up.

No problems prevented me from having a lot of fun with this mecha godfather. Though outdone by contemporary offerings, fans must watch Mobile Suit Gundam. How did they go from this to Gundam Wing?

Art – Medium

Mobile Suit Gundam definitely looks old, but is better than imagined – good amount of animation. It lacks the vibrant style of later series and character designs are weird. Half the characters look anime and the other half look western from the era.

Sound – Medium

The modern dub by the same team behind Gundam 00 and SEED is far superior to the old Japanese. Director Yoshiyuki Tomino thought the original recording was too bad for release with the dub initially. The music is omega old – nothing like modern Gundam’s electronic scores – accompanied by classic sci-fi bleeps and bloops. It’s not great, but it has charm in how…inexperienced it is.

Story – Medium

The Principality of Zeon declares itself independent from the Earth government and a stalemate war breaks out, cracked only with the creation of the ‘Gundam’ war machine. A classic series marked by age that is still enjoyable today.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: For Gundam fans, a must. Mobile Suit Gundam 0079 takes fans back to the Mecca of the franchise, where most staples began.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Positive Recommended English Voice Track

Negative: None

Mobile Suit Gundam Wing – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Shin Kidou Senki Gundam Wing

 

Related: Gundam Wing: Endless Waltz (sequel – included in review)

Similar: Gundam 00

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Mecha Science Fiction Action Drama

Length: 49 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Good voice work.

Negatives:

  • Awful characters.
  • Pants-on-head stupid politics.
  • Stilted animation.
  • Cringe worthy dialogue.
  • Two episodes of recap.

I wasn’t prepared for it to be so terrible. Gundam Wing, what a wreck.

Gundam Wing’s first episode overflows with the arse gravy that will set the tone for the rest of the series. We witness the space colonies fight back against the tyrannical Earth Alliance by sending five Gundams down to Earth disguised as meteors. At first, the plot only follows one pilot, Heero, the brooding one from the Backstreet Boys for girls to squee over despite having no personality, as proven moments later when he threatens to kill Relena and she instantly falls in love with him. Of. Course…

Heero’s cover is as a student in the richest school, where Relena is the richest of them all. She is a Mary Sue in every sense of the term. She is so loved by all for no reason other than being rich (a level of wealth that isn’t achievable as the daughter of a minister, for that matter) to the point where she receives a standing ovation for giving Heero a birthday invitation. You think I jest; you think I miswrote; surely, it must be something greater than an invitation? If only it were. If only it were…

Later on, she ascends to leader of a pacifist faction. Her strategy to world peace? “Hey, everyone, why don’t we all throw away our weapons.” (And all writers around the world collectively facepalmed at such stupidity.) Don’t mistake this for some naïve ideal that a five-year-old would make when she hears her father, the president, is struggling with an armed conflict – “Daddy, if no one had guns, and then no one could kill.” “Aw, that’s cute sweetie.” Of course, the president doesn’t take this endearing remark seriously. But in Gundam Wing, Relena’s imbecility is not only taken seriously, but is also the prevailing theory for the good guys. It isn’t her age (fifteen) that bothers me, but the incompetence of character and writing. I would wish for the antagonist to win, but his theory is to achieve peace by destroying everything – again, not ironic. Unlike Gundam 00 where many criticise war as a deterrent for war, here, he has huge support. There is only so much stupid you can cram into one story, and yet, Gundam Wing manages to push that limit.

The rest of the Backstreet Boys (watch them pose for a photo shoot in the OP and I defy you not to think ‘boy band’) are Duo (two), Trowa (three – wait a minute…), Quatre (four – oh!), and Wufei (five – my mind is blown! [Sarcasm] Did they have to be so on the nose?). Like a boy band, they each do one thing, never-evolving, never showing variance by show’s end. Even their introductions are like a boy band; they turn to the camera and say, “My name is X, for the record.” How did no one point out the forced nature? How did anyone even consider this good writing to begin with, worth the time to write down?

Bloody hell, I almost forgot the obsession with being An Hero. Seemingly every episode, some guy has the idea to self-detonate his Gundam. One does detonate while standing in the cockpit (it’s to look cool, okay, pfft, obvs!) and he survives with barely a scratch. Pity. It’s as if these characters are desperate to exit stage left as soon as possible. Then again, which such awful dialogue, which actor wouldn’t want to exit? A gem comes from Wufei when he says (paraphrase), “If you are right [in this argument], then you will beat me in a fight.” Yes, Wufei, because the more intelligent people always hit the hardest. Again, I must stress that all this is delivered and accepted without a hint of irony. The writers truly thought the audience would find this cool.

Then there is this irritating Gundam trope where every character and their mums have to have a say in the scene. Two pilots fighting, let’s cut away to some irrelevant git give his opinion. Imagine trying to get through a dialogue with someone, only to have a dozen other people inject “cool” one-liners about how awesome the person you are talking to is. Shut. Up. I feel this stems from an inability for two characters to carry the dialogue due to writer incompetence.

There is so much more wrong with Gundam Wing, but it would take pages to cover, so I will touch on a final flaw: the plan. These pilots come down to Earth and they don’t know each other’s identities. Really. The writers probably thought it would be “cool” to have the Backstreet Boys fight each other before they realise they’re on the same team. Yes, because basic sense and logic mean nothing beside fan service rubbish. If these guys were the only hope for my country, I’d say we are screwed.

Gundam Wing’s core idea – rebels versus tyrants with lots of politics – isn’t a bad one, but the execution certainly is. I can’t believe how much I wanted to see Gundam Wing after those ads on Toonami back in the day. With Gundam Wing’s fame, it is no surprise that many avoid the Gundam franchise after watching this.

Art – Medium

Gundam Wing has a decent aesthetic but the production quality is sub-par, particularly when you compare to the likes of Bebop and Trigun that extracted more with the same resources. There are a lot of still pans across groups in conversation with no animation.

Sound – Low

The OP song is a nostalgia trip and I still enjoy it today (helps if you don’t know what the Engrish is trying to say). The voice work is good, but the script is utter arse.

Story – Very Low

An action and political space opera that doesn’t know the first thing of politics and tries too hard to make characters cool during action. Could have done with one decent character.

Overall Quality – Low

Recommendation: Avoid this. If you watch Gundam Wing, it will likely put you off the franchise as a whole. Watch Gundam SEED instead, or Gundam 00 if you want a similar plot.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: None.

Negative:

Atrocious PlotAwful DialogueDissapointingInduces StupidityMary SueNo DevelopmentRubbish Major CharactersUseless Side Cast

Mobile Suit Gundam SEED Destiny – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kidou Senshi Gundam SEED Destiny

 

Related: Gundam SEED (prequel)

Mobile Suit Gundam Seed C.E.73: Stargazer (side story)

Similar: Gundam 00

Aldnoah.Zero

Code Geass

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Mecha Science Fiction Action Adventure Drama

Length: 50 episodes

 

Positives:

  • The return of SEED characters.
  • More of SEED’s great music.

Negatives:

  • The narrative parallels SEED too closely.
  • Most new characters are dull, or worse, irritating.
  • More Cagalli than before.
  • Overuse of flashbacks and two recap episodes, even with the HD remaster.
  • Many repeated animations.

If you read my Gundam SEED review, you know that I have a fondness for that series. However, it’s with a heavy heart that I must convey how disappointed I am with Gundam SEED Destiny. My greatest issue is with how unnecessary this sequel feels, as I shall illustrate.

We start with a tenuous diplomatic mission, where Cagalli, now head representative of Orb, takes umbrage with the idea of ZAFT having a military, even for defence. (Whose bloody idea was it to keep her around? She presents the best case never to have a monarch in power.) Mid-diplomacy talks, Earth Federation agents infiltrate the ZAFT compound and steal three new Gundam units, destroying much in the process. (Wait a minute…) Cagalli and her bodyguard Athrun must flee aboard Minerva, the latest ZAFT vessel on her maiden voyage, where he is forced to pilot a Gundam as the only veteran aboard. (This sounds oddly familiar…) The three infiltrators are “extended” humans, always squabbling with each other. Stop, stop… Am I watching SEED again? All of this is the same, save for a few faction swaps and minor details. I could understand if they wanted to start this way (as in each Harry Potter book), pay tribute to the prequel or draw a parallel, but here, the similarities ring true throughout the plot.

Forced descent through Earth’s atmosphere with a Gundam trapped outside? Yes. Nukes launched against the Coordinator space colonies? Of course. Effeminate villain in the shadows that loathes Coordinators? Naturally. Weird, out-of-body, space floaty-thingy, experience after the loss of a lover that broke a main character? Why even ask? Destiny is the definition of a Hollywood sequel. Most of the new characters, and Athrun in parts, go through the same events as Kira and crew the first time around.

Destiny is at its best with the new events for returning characters. Lacus and Kira run an orphanage in the countryside, but their peace and quiet cannot last, especially with the advent Cagalli forced into a political marriage. Of interest to me, was Lacus’s plotline and how the new ZAFT chairman, Durandal (most interesting new character), handles the aftermath of her actions from SEED. Kira, though he remains important, serves as a weapon, more than anything else, for Lacus. The Archangel’s plot line is interesting, even with less screen time than the new ships.

Seeing the old crew is a pleasure – except Cagalli. (Die already!) How the hell she is the leader of a nation, I will never know. It’s not just that she makes bad decisions; she makes no decisions. A deer in the headlights is more decisive than her. For the majority of the series, she spends her time crying. What a pathetic leader. I knew she should have died episode one last season.

Oh, I haven’t even mentioned the protagonist – that should indicate how weak a character he is. Shinn, an Orb war refugee turned ZAFT soldier, pilots Minerva’s strongest Gundam, Impulse. Which reminds me… The launch sequences, bloody hell, what a chore. What feels like every second episode, we have to watch Impulse and its individual parts load into the launcher and then take off one by one (why not go pre-assembled?) before they fuse Megazord-style – twice per episode if he swaps loadout mid-battle. Just wait until Impulse launches with several other mechs. The repeated combat animations aren’t as bad this time around, but these launch sequences certainly pick up that hot poker and start stabbing you to make sure you never forget the pain. This is a case where they jumped the Rule of Cool.

Anyway, back to Shinn (do I have to?) and his incessant whining. He’s the kid who would have the snot beaten out of him every time he speaks – yes, he is that annoying, and even worse with the Japanese voice. He’s lucky Cagalli is there to nab the spotlight. And yet, Shinn’s greatest issue isn’t even his personality, but his purpose here. I cannot comprehend why they chose him, of all characters, to be protagonist. Yes, I understand that the loss of his family in SEED’s Orb battle ties him to the conflict; however, you could say that about anyone. Everyone has lost something in war. The writers didn’t do anything with Shinn, which is a strange statement to make, as he partakes in most fights. Seriously, why him? Shinn has no impact on the grander plot, unlike Athrun, Lacus, or Durandal.

Gundam SEED Destiny is by no means a bad anime. Not by a long shot. If Gundam SEED hadn’t come first to tell all these familiar plot points already, Destiny would have left a better impression. As is, however, the similarities are too obvious. And more Cagalli? Really? Why?!

Art – Medium

Slightly better quality than SEED’s HD remaster, as the art style was already in place. The remaster removed an episode’s worth of recap and added a few new scenes to go with the HD resolution and widescreen. Repeated animations, launch sequences in particular, are still a plague.

Sound – High

The English track is better, Ocean Studios returning with another great dub, and Shinn’s Japanese nasal makes me want to go deaf. Like SEED, the electronic and techno music is great.

Story – Medium

I know that war never changes, but plots do change. Destiny sticks too close to original.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: Only for fans of Gundam SEED who want to see more of Kira and crew. Regardless of whether you watch Gundam SEED Destiny, you should watch Gundam Seed C.E.73: Stargazer, the side story. It shows the war from civilian perspectives, taking an approach more for adult audiences, and the only context you need is that the space battle impacted a country on Earth.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Great MusicPositive Recommended English Voice Track

Negative:

DissapointingNo Development

Mobile Suit Gundam SEED – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kidou Senshi Gundam SEED

 

Related: Gundam SEED Destiny (sequel)

Similar: Gundam 00

Aldnoah.Zero

Code Geass

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Mecha Science Fiction Action Adventure Drama Romance

Length: 48 episodes (HD remaster), 50 Episodes (original)

 

Positives:

  • Great characters with plenty of interpersonal drama.
  • A well-woven adventure that doesn’t rely on exposition dumps.
  • Love the music and English voice work.
  • Rich lore and world building between the factions.

Negatives:

  • Cagali – what an irritation.
  • Repeated battle animations.
  • Unnecessary flashbacks.

Thinking back on Gundam SEED, I am actually surprised that I like this anime. I rarely buy into the idea that teens are best equipped for the job in anime, yelling an opponent’s name during combat is one of the stupidest tropes imaginable, and teen melodrama often makes me cringe. And yet, Gundam SEED manages to execute these irritants with a surprising amount of skill.

When the ZAFT military attacks the space colony of Heliopolis to procure the Earth Alliance Gundams, Kira and his friends are forced into a war between Naturals (ordinary humans) and Coordinators, genetically modified humans from ZAFT. They flee the crumbling colony aboard the Earth Alliance spaceship, Archangel; however, Kira is a Coordinator and this is a Natural ship. As a Coordinator, he is the only one capable of piloting the single Gundam they could save, though he is reluctant to kill. To complicate life further, his childhood friend Athrun is a Gundam pilot for ZAFT. Kira’s inner turmoil when facing his friend and as the one everyone relies on makes for great conflict.

This setup is what sold me on the ‘teens as soldiers’ premise. They attended military school before the attack and only fill bridge crew positions, never portrayed as sudden professionals. There are two exceptions to this: Kira, of course, modified for war, and Flay (the love-to-hate type), a spoilt rich girl who contributes nothing and has a particular hatred towards Coordinators. The challenge comes, not from their talents, but from how they cope with the conflict in which they reside. Their home is destroyed, their parents are probably dead, ZAFT hunts them, and they have to deal with the realities of war. These kids receive little respite between battles.

I love the sense of camaraderie aboard the ship and the regular life moments while on the move – reminds of Star Trek: The Next Generation, where the ship feels like home.

On the other side of the battle, we have the ZAFT ship with Athrun aboard. They cannot allow the Archangel to regroup with the Earth forces and create more of these new weapons. ZAFT is interesting because they are no more evil than the Alliance. Both sides have shades of honour and malice, creating an interesting dynamic, as you can’t be sure which side you want to prevail. We see plenty of politics, in particular where it involves the animosity between Naturals and Coordinators – the lore is at the heart of most conflict.

More factions soon enter the narrative, such as Blue Cosmos (they are to Coordinators what the Nazis were to Jews), and a desert tribe, which brings with it, the worst character – Cagali. When I said earlier that I don’t buy teens as being right for the job, she is what I meant. Nothing about Cagali inspires confidence or skill, and yet, we are told repeatedly that she is an asset to the war. She couldn’t be more useless. It doesn’t help that she is so incredibly whiny either. Believe it or not, she is tame here compared to the sequel, Destiny. If only she had died at the start.

Cagali is the one character that sees little development. Many other characters that you likely hate from the start may grow on you before the end, or vice versa.

Gundam SEED starts strong and had me hooked to the very end, barring a few flashback slowdowns. I kept moving from one episode to the next – Gundam in general has that effect.

HD Remaster: The remaster updates the visuals to HD with Destiny’s art style (I am not a fan of the baby-face, though it is better on a technical level), which includes reanimations. The major changes are a few extra scenes (backstory for a villain, a relationship scene), less recap scenes (cuts two episodes total, though still leaves one in the middle for some inexplicable reason), and a reworked conclusion. Problems? Too many flashbacks remain; I swear to you, they play this one flashback for several episodes in a row. Why not remove them all with the remaster? Also, they pull a George Lucas with a ‘Greedo shot first’ style retcon for a character’s death.

Art – Medium

The mech designs, characters, environments, all look good; however, the sheer amount of repeated battle animations when dealing with cannon fodder is inexcusable. The HD remaster does remove or reanimate some of these scenes, but still, it isn’t enough. Also, pink explosions in space? Is this to be more kid-friendly? I wish they had brought the visuals up to the level of Gundam 00 with the remaster.

Sound – High

Fantastic soundtrack of techno and electronic music. I love all of the opening and ending songs – OP gets you hyped, forlorn in the ED. Good Japanese track, greater English track, as some voices don’t sound right in Japanese. Kira crying in Japanese is…something. Also, we get Trevor Devall as Mwu La Fllaga, Archangel’s Han Solo, in English.

Story – High

Gundam SEED is a close observation of individuals at the heart of a space war. The characters and interpersonal drama that crosses faction boundaries elevates SEED above the standard Gundam fare.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Highly recommended for Gundam fans or those looking to start the franchise. Gundam SEED requires no prior knowledge. Despite a couple of stumbles, the remaster is preferable.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Extensive Character DevelopmentGreat MusicPositive Recommended English Voice TrackStellar Voice Acting

Negative: None