Tag Archives: Intelligent

The show as a whole, often due to intelligent characters, has intellectual depth.

Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kidou Senshi Gundam: The Origin

 

Related: Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin – Loum Arc (sequel)

Mobile Suit Gundam (original version)

Similar: Code Geass

Legend of the Galactic Heroes

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Mecha Science Fiction Action

Length: 4 episodes (1 hr. each)

 

Positives:

  • “Char” Aznable.
  • A Gundam protagonist that earns every step of his power.
  • Mix of politics, assassinations, and war.
  • No Gundam vagueness.

Negatives:

  • Ill-suited slapstick.
  • (Where is my next episode?)

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Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin is pitched as a retelling of the series that started it all, Mobile Suit Gundam. Of course I would watch a remake of a classic I enjoyed. I thought we would open on Amuro, the original protagonist, so when it focused on a blond child called Casval and his little sister, I admit to my confusion. Where’s Amuro?

As it turns out, Gundam: The Origin starts before the original, at the inciting incident that led Char Aznable on the path to become such an enigmatic figure in the wars to come. I am hooked. Char is the most interesting character in Universal Century Gundam, so to see him as protagonist, with his backstory explored in depth, is a delight.

After a teaser of adult Char in a space battle, we return to him as a child on a space colony. His family’s high-class life shatters with the sudden death of his father, an advocate for Spacenoid (citizens of space colonies) independence. The father’s supporters smell foul play in this “natural” death and anarchy breaks loose on the streets. Everything is in disarray. Who’s in charge? Who’s allied with whom? What does each player in the game want? Answers are hard to find.

Char, his sister, and his mother are now valuable pieces in either inciting further action or quelling the riots. Life pushes them around. For Char, however, this isn’t a life worth living. He begins to plot a course towards revenge. Will he get revenge though? And on whom? With so many players in the game, his quest won’t be an easy one.

Gundam: The Origin is a good show in all aspects, but Char makes it great. As an anti-hero, we are never quite sure what he will do to achieve his goal. When he’s friendly with someone, we a never sure if he’s actually friends with them or up to something. Up to something – that’s a good way of summing up Char. He’s always up to something

Beyond him, Gundam: The Origin has an extensive cast, each with a purpose in this political maelstrom. Friends, enemies, or somewhere in between, you will meet all sorts. Barring some random slapstick, the cast feels written for an older audience than typical Gundam, which I suspect stems from having an older protagonist in Char. It’s a refreshing change, especially coupled with him earning power and skill through work rather than having it all thrown at him like other Gundam series (Unicorn) that I will not mention here (Unicorn).

The writing as a whole is leaps better than what I expect from a Universal Century series. Vague dialogue is nowhere in sight. No one stands in the open cockpit of a mech preparing to self-destruct while they spout some “cool” line instead of running clear. The conflict and political landscape is coherent (unless intentionally masked for story), free of the vague nonsense that plagues this franchise. There is no rambling on about the ‘dialogues’ to come, the ‘dialogues’ that will solve all, the bloody ‘dialogues’ that will answer the meaning of bloody life! No complaints about the writing from me this time.

And so, we reach my major gripe. Where is my next episode? I want more, damn it! You can’t just start the story, give me all this good writing, an amazing protagonist, political intrigue that makes me lean forward, and then just end it right there. What are you playing at, Sunrise?

If future Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin entries maintain this quality, it could very well earn a ‘Very High’ rating from me.

Art – High

The chaotic action scenes use CG for the mechs and ships, but it works well, as spaceships don’t need much work and the particle effects mask it well. Unlike the recent Berserk that has random camera movements, just because, Gundam: The Origin takes advantage of the CG with a dynamic camera that dives into the action. Everything else is clean.

Sound – High

Good voice work. The script is less wishy-washy than other Universal Century Gundam. When a character needs to say something, they say it.

Story – High

A retelling of the original Mobile Suit Gundam, but from before the start with the events that made Char the legend he has become. I expected another Gundam Unicorn; I got something great instead.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Watch it. Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin is a great place to start for newcomers to the gargantuan franchise, while also giving plenty to veterans.

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Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Deep NarrativeStrong Lead Characters

Negative: None

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Legend of the Galactic Heroes – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Ginga Eiyuu Densetsu

 

Related: In recommended viewing order, all are prequels (none included in review):

Legend of the Galactic Heroes: My Conquest is the Sea of Stars

Legend of the Galactic Heroes: Overture to a New War

Legend of the Galactic Heroes Gaiden: Golden Wings

Legend of the Galactic Heroes Gaiden: A Hundred Billion Stars

Legend of the Galactic Heroes Gaiden: Spiral Labyrinth

 

Similar: Code Geass

Rose of Versailles

Mobile Suit Gundam

Game of Thrones (TV)

 

Watched in: Japanese

Genre: Science Fiction War Drama

Length: 110 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Endless depth to the characters and story.
  • Unpredictable conflict and developments.
  • Masterclass in dialogue and performance.
  • Galaxy building.
  • Orchestral and operatic score.
  • Riveting to the end.

Negatives:

  • Art and sound show their age in the first season.

(Request an anime for review here.)

How do I talk about Legend of the Galactic Heroes? How do I tell you this is anime greatness without overhyping it? When someone says x movie is the best movie ever made, it never lives up to expectations, even if it is the best movie because of how our brains equate “best” to mean “flawless.” And if we find a single point we don’t like, our cynical brains say, “This is the best? Pfft, didn’t anyone else see he was wearing a Rolex in medieval warfare? Unwatchable!” So, when you read this review, don’t believe anything I say until you see it for yourself. I don’t want overhype.

In an alternate future, the Galactic Empire ruled the stars until several planets rebelled and formed the Free Planets Alliance in the name of democracy. This decades war with tens of thousands of ships and billions of lives on the board has no end in sight. Both sides believe victory is at hand with the rise of their respective heroes – Reinhard von Lohengramm, young, arrogant, ambitious, on the Empire’s front line and Yang Wen-Li the miracle strategist of the FPA.

Legend of the Galactic Heroes is a space opera of epic proportions with so many characters, so many threads, and so much conflict that it’s tough to simplify. In essence, take Star Wars but from the perspective of the commanders rather than the pilots and Jedi, while also dealing with the political complexities of Game of Thrones. The Alliance draws parallels to the UK, USA, and East Asia, whereas the Empire has a more WW2 German and European aristocratic design. As if leading millions into battle wasn’t enough, Yang and Reinhard have to manoeuvre the political landscape of aristocrats plotting for maximum profits in war, politicians using any opportunity to gain favour, factions within factions, and even military superiors threatened by their rise through the ranks. Galactic Heroes throws conflict from all sides at its protagonists. Their mettle tested, inexperience crushed, relationships strained, kindness seared by enemies, the reality of war will change them.

The greatness of Galactic Heroes dwells in its handling of the conflict, particularly between Yang and Reinhard. I’m sure we’ve all seen stories where the author favours their protagonist to the point of unrealistic wins for said protagonist. That problem doesn’t poison this narrative. With two protagonists on opposing sides, such favouritism isn’t possible. A win for Reinhard is likely a loss for Yang and his allies or vice versa. And you never know who will win a given battle. Such unpredictability and masterful plotting keeps the audience leaning forward, hands gripping armrests as a character could die at any moment. The first episode kills what I thought was a major character.

Furthermore, the dictatorship versus democracy motif isn’t so black and white. The easy road is to paint one side as evil while the other shines like a monastery of saints. The hard road means to balance both, using no black or white, just grey across all players in the game. “Who is right?” is a complex question to answer when everyone has flaws. One detail that stuck with me is the Patriotic Knight Police of the Alliance, who will beat anyone that disturbs the peace and “unity” of the Alliance’s democracy – “You are free to say anything you want as long as it’s what we like.”

The quality is even more impressive once you realise Galactic Heroes is ninety-five percent dialogue. You wouldn’t imagine such a dialogue heavy story could be this riveting – in most cases, dialogue dominance does result in boredom – however, this dialogue is so sharp, so lean that every line builds the world, builds character, or advances the plot. You must pay attention.

Galactic Heroes’ overarching plot is a slow one, as is the case in real life war and politics. To offset what could be poor pacing, short stories occur episode to episode. For example, we may see how Reinhard deals with a gluttonous noble in one episode, while the next may dive into a moment of history and build the world with richness that makes loremasters foam at the mouth. A personal standout was the rise of the first Kaiser and how the public gave him ultimate dictatorship, free rights sacrificed for what they believed was the greater good. He then executed 20,000 people on mere suspicion of planning his assassination. The next emperor killed 500,000,000 in an uprising and exiled another 10,000,000,000 relatives by association. Galactic Heroes draws on real world events for its conflicts with an attention to detail rarely seen in fiction – “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” These writers studied their history.

Longer story arcs often focus on a ship-to-ship battle, where fleets dot space like stars in the night. Though these battles have plenty of action, our view is still from the bridge alongside the commanders – imagine spectating a real-time strategy game. Seldom do we fly out with a dogfighter. That said, important pilots enter the story later on for us to follow.

A most interesting battle occurs early when Yang has the task of capturing Iserlohn Fortress, an artificial and impenetrable planet thanks to its Death Star-like weapon, Thor’s Hammer, capable of wiping a fleet in a single shot. Every battle has complex strategies that keep the audience riveted throughout.

Galactic Heroes has its flaws, of course. Outside of its age, my main complaint would regard some of the minor characters. After a hiatus for several dozen episodes, some important yet unmemorable characters crop up once more and I ask myself, “Who is that again?” for a few episodes. It’s a problem because context is everything with such complex dynamics, where a detail as simple as a character’s faction alignment can change all meaning in their words. The immense crew of memorable characters makes this particularly noticeable.

Alright, I have talked enough. I could go on for days if I don’t stop myself and this is already my longest review by fifty percent – didn’t even touch on the cast of a hundred characters, the planet dedicated entirely to banking, Reinhard’s sister being married to the Kaiser, religious elements, and so much more. I don’t like to set ‘my favourite’ anime in stone without giving it time to simmer as I deconstruct every facet for a while, but I expect Legend of the Galactic Heroes to claim the throne when all is seen and reviewed. I didn’t hold this back for my 200th anime review for no reason.

Art – High

The art starts old (not 70s hair old) and the animation is a little wobbly. However, the show goes for so long that the art improves significantly. In fact, you can see the difference between old and new within the same scene as it switches shots in season one. Like a lot of older sci-fi, much of our technology is more advanced than predicted, but Galactic Heroes uses a coherence of style and society to draw us in regardless. I would recognise these characters instantly.

Sound – Very High

Along the art’s vein, audio quality starts feeling old but soon improves. I love the Austrian influenced orchestra and opera, which sounds like attending a war with Mozart playing on one side and Beethoven on the other. The actors are perfect throughout, thanks in no small part to the phenomenal script (see how many industry veterans you recognise in their early days). Outside some occasional Engrish music (for the Alliance national anthem, oddly enough), I have no complaints.

Story – Very High

Two factions of opposing ideologies war across the stars as their leaders crumble around them, giving rise to two heroes who will shape the conflict like no other. It is difficult to capture into words the grandeur and depth of Legend of the Galactic Heroes’ story. Characters, conflict, or story, there is little to improve.

Overall Quality – Very High

Recommendation: A must watch. Legend of the Galactic Heroes is phenomenal in every way and should be experienced by all. However, this is a demanding anime. If you can’t dedicate the time and focus to pay attention, it’s simply not worth trying. Also, do keep its age in mind when you start.

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Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Deep NarrativeEngaging DialogueExtensive Character DevelopmentGreat MusicGreat OP or ED SequenceHoly S***Phenomenal VillainRiveting ActionStellar Voice ActingStrategicStrong Lead CharactersStrong Support Characters

Negative: None

Parasyte -the maxim- – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kiseijuu: Sei no Kakuritsu

 

Similar: Tokyo Ghoul

Death Note

Shiki

Midori Days

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Psychological Horror Action Drama Science Fiction

Length: 24 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Complex dynamic between protagonist and his Parasyte.
  • Freaky mutations.
  • Commentary on humanity.
  • Development of the Parasytes.
  • Excellent acting.

Negatives:

  • A little flub at the end.
  • Doesn’t explain the ability to sense Parasytes by some humans.

(Request an anime for review here.)

I went into Parasyte –the maxim- having just completed Tokyo Ghoul, whose disappointing story and characters still weighed on me at how squandered an opportunity that anime was. To make matters worse, I had chosen Tokyo Ghoul as the anime to end the quality drought I had lived through the previous month (my watch order isn’t the same as review order). How wrong I was to rely on Tokyo Ghoul. So, when Parasyte started in similar fashion with ordinary student Shinichi suddenly thrust into the supernatural world, I reserved expectations.

He awakens one day with an alien Parasyte inside his body. Parasytes are supposed to assume full control of their hosts, but his didn’t have enough time to latch onto the brain, thus stayed confined to his right arm. After the initial freak out, Shinichi and Migi, as it calls itself, form a symbiotic relationship for survival, as other Parasytes take a deadly interest in a host still having full brain function and knowledge of their existence. Shinichi also employs Migi’s strength to stop other Parasytes from harming humans.

The star of the show is Migi, no question. Not only is it amusing to see Shinichi’s right hand move with a mind of its own, studying while he sleeps or commenting on his dates, but Migi is a genuine threat. I have lost count how many times a protagonist has formed an alliance with a dangerous character promising to kill the protagonist for one false move, but no one believes the threat whatsoever, removing any tension. For some reason, these characters are usually teens trying to act cool with no personalities to speak of.

To Parasytes, as with most creatures, survival is the ultimate protocol and when Migi says he will kill anyone Shinichi tells about the Parasytes, you believe it. Migi will do anything to stay protected. Deaths are merciless.

Migi’s calculating cold logic, for he struggles with the concept of emotion, makes for gripping character interactions. For example, he knows that helping Shinichi kill other Parasytes is a part of their give-take relationship, yet it doesn’t stop him commenting on how Parasytes feeding on humans is no different from humans feeding on nature. Humans should just accept this, he says. Furthermore, as he and other Parasytes adapt to human society, it’s fascinating to see their development, how they react to ‘human’ elements of life.

Most fascinating is the teacher/researcher of the Parasytes and her intrigue with the concept of offspring and motherhood. Why do we care for little bundles of flesh that do no more than cry and soil themselves at our wallet’s expense? The writer demonstrates great understanding of humanity. The story hits its best when she and a human detective on the Parasyte trail enter the fray.

Parasyte does have some problems. The one that bothered me most was this girl’s ability to sense Parasytes while not being one herself. Parasytes can sense each other because of their empathic connection, so how did select humans acquire this radar without a Parasyte? Her romantic subplot is fine – competes with Shinichi’s crush Satomi – but an explanation wouldn’t have gone amiss.

Another fault is in the ending – not the actual ending, the second ending. Parasyte reaches its climax in the twenty-third episode, setting up episode twenty-four as a ‘wind down’ story. No, something new comes up for ten minutes to create a final host-parasite interaction that is pointless and weakens the actual ending. Still, it’s so pointlessness it doesn’t ruin the series prior.

I am surprised that I had heard little to nothing of Parasyte beforehand, considering its quality. Perhaps the body horror is a little too off-putting.

Art – High

Creatively disgusting monsters are well animated, especially during transformations. Sharp art.

Sound – Very High

This anime boasts great acting in both tracks – the Parasytes’ actors in particular – and a varied soundtrack reminiscent of Death Note. The sound effects for transformations can be funny, like the blowing of raspberries when shrinking back to hand form.

Story – Very High

A high schooler wakes one morning with a Parasyte in his right hand, capable of changing shape to aid or kill. Parasyte starts well, reaching greatness in the second act as characters develop and the Parasytes adapt to the human life.

Overall Quality – Very High

Recommendation: A must watch unless eyeballs and mouths sprouting anywhere on the body gives you the shivers. Paraystethe maxim- came to me after a glut of bad to mediocre anime and ended the suffering with its impressive characters and development.

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Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Deep NarrativeExtensive Character DevelopmentStellar Voice ActingStrong Lead Characters

Negative: None

Psycho-Pass – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Psycho-Pass

 

Related: Psycho-Pass 2

Similar: Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex

From the New World

Ergo Proxy

Death Note

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Psychological Science Fiction Action

Length: 22 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Engaging exploration of cause and effect in human crime.
  • Interesting cases driven by complex villains.
  • The future and tech aesthetic.

Negatives:

  • Protagonist is the weakest of the cast.
  • Some audio lets the team down.

In the 22nd century, Japan enforces and prevents crime by way of the Sibyl System, an objective network that determines a citizen’s Crime Coefficient (CO) by analysing their mind, their Psycho-Pass, for criminal intent. Some say the system is too objective. Inspectors carry out the judgements of Sybil against those whose coefficients rise to dangerous levels. However, the Enforcers (former Inspectors with high CO given life in exchange for service – a Suicide Squad) do all the dirty work, keeping Inspectors clean. Judgement usually means death, for no criminal mind may infringe upon this perfect society.

Psycho-Pass predicts the criminal rather than just the crime like in Minority Report. In Minority Report, a chain of events lead an individual to want to commit a crime, and the system predicts this for prevention. Psycho-Pass takes a step further, or rather ten steps backwards, to before a crime even occurs to the person, to the seed of “wrong-think” in the individual.

Perhaps an office worker is passed over for promotion in favour of another and he feels resentment for this injustice. Now, he doesn’t wish harm upon the other worker or the manager, but that resentment is enough to elevate his CO into criminal levels. One can be scanned at random anytime. The worst part – and most interesting – factor in this system is that if you are the victim of a crime, unable to cope with the trauma and wish for justice or revenge (as is understandable) against the criminal, solely in your mind, Sybil brands you a criminal as well. It’s an infinite loop of self-fulfilling prophecies in the world of Psycho-Pass. And I love it! Acknowledging this flaw in the first episode told me I was in for something great.

We navigate this 1984-style society through the eyes of Inspector Akane, a young woman with a heart for truth and justice. Alongside her is Enforcer Kogami, a realist who will shatter her idealistic view of the system. On the front lines with her team, she sees first-hand how just and fair the system is, bringing all she thought into question. Their dynamic is an interesting one and plays well. However, this is largely due to Kogami and the world itself; Akane is a bit too much of a blank slate. She’s not harem protagonist bland, but we never get a sense that she is someone beyond her job. Even a workaholic should have influences outside the job.

The plot structure is a crime serial with several smaller cases and an overarching major villain entering the picture several times, similar to Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex. I don’t know if there is something in the air or water at sci-fi crime studios, but they always seem to have excellent villains. Psycho-Pass is no exception. These villains complement the central theme of humanity and free thought perfectly, sometimes through twisted means. No case was boring. That said, they aren’t quite as clever as GITS: SAC.

Lastly, the tech and world design are awesome. From the neon lights of this pristine city to way the guns transform between non-lethal and lethal modes to, my favourite, the augmented reality HUD in one’s eyes, Psycho-Pass boasts a well-thought-out science fiction world. I would live in this city in the future – barring the Sybil system, of course.

At this point, I can’t say anymore to convince you to watch Psycho-Pass. It’s by no means a perfect anime, but what it does right is handily worth your time.

Art – High

Good art and animation blend CG nicely with lighting and filters such as rain. Love the world design. Despite the dark settings, the city’s neon lights create a nice colour contrast.

Sound – High

Good in both languages, but I – quite predictably – prefer the Japanese thanks to Tomokazu Seki (Kogami) in his iconic stoic character designation. While the electronic music fits the show, the OPs sound drugged – unless that’s for theme, but Sci-Fi drugs aren’t relevant here. Also, a high-frequency screech almost made my ears bleed at times.

Story – High

In the future, a central system scans citizens’ thoughts to pre-empt criminal behaviour, leading to a perfectly rigid society. Minority Report fuses with 1984 to create an engaging crime serial in Psycho-Pass.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Must watch, unless you don’t enjoy crime shows. Psycho-Pass’s concept alone warrants your attention, at least for one season.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Deep NarrativePhenomenal Villain

Negative: None

Death Parade – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Death Parade

 

Related: Death Billiards (side episode)

Similar: Death Note

Angel Beats!

Hell Girl

Bartender

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Psychological Thriller Mystery Game

Length: 12 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Superb intensity and a thrilling premise.
  • Realistic understanding of human nature.
  • Sharp dialogue and to the point.
  • The first episode.

Negatives:

  • Second episode.
  • Non-game episodes aren’t as interesting.

After death, all go to a bar in Limbo, a quiet place, where bartender Decim waits to judge passing souls, pitting them against each other in pub games like bowling, darts, and arcade cabinets. These are no mere games, however. Each point, each strike…each miss has consequences, for they inflict pain on the opponent, or worse, reveal one’s true self in this parade of death. Reincarnation awaits those found worthy, the eternal void for all others. Actions and emotions make a dangerous game.

Death Parade is an anime few people talk of, so I entered its muted atmosphere not knowing what to expect, much like the dead contestants. Further like the contestants, I found myself stunned by what I had seen. Death Parade has not only one of the best first episodes in anime, but of any TV series out there. Tension, suspense, emotion, drama, and full character arcs, all synthesised in twenty minutes.

Although the games involve an element of physical pain for losing points, the true conflict lies in mental torture. Anyone can create the blandness of a SAW-like competition; few can elevate it to the inner core of psychology and emotion. Death Parade nails this element.

As a game progresses, memories from the players’ lives return, piece by piece, and it is in how the characters react to these pieces that determines who they truly are. Best of all, Death Parade does not go easy on the characters out of pity. Yes, you will pity many among the dead, but like reality, pity will not erase a poor decision. As more memories return, the greater the strain and conflict becomes on these people, escalating tension to breaking point. And it is brilliant.

However, Death Parade isn’t all success. After the masterful first episode, comes the series’ worst episode, where they explain everything from the first, doing away with the subtlety and different interpretations of the characters’ actions – was the character telling the truth or lying? The second episode is designed to explain Limbo and the concept of the judgment game, but it explains too much. Furthermore, other episodes show all we need to know about Limbo anyway – could probably skip episode two altogether.

Overarching the several games is the plot of Decim, a novice arbiter, and his assistant, the ‘Black Haired Woman,’ who seems most human of all Limbo residents. She adds humanity to the arbitrations, an offset against Decim’s no-nonsense, stoic attitude as he learns the intricacies of passing judgement. His jokes are so serious that no one even considers he may be kidding. I like their story, particularly where it concludes.

This in mind, episodes that don’t focus on a game or judgement aren’t as interesting. I would have thought God playing galactic billiards with a manager would be fascinating, but it’s not. If there were one thing I would have added, it would be deeper world building in Limbo. We get too little to be interesting enough.

Death Parade was a complete surprise to me. I can’t even remember how it entered my backlog, yet I am delighted to have watched it, picked at random from my list. Do yourself a favour and watch Death Parade – also hope this Limbo isn’t real once you die.

Art – High

With emotion being a core element of Death Parade, the artists did an excellent job at capturing it, especially the negative emotions. Great imagery and use of composition to compound tension.

Sound – Very High

When the emotions hit, positive or negative, the actors truly deliver – in either language – accompanied by great dialogue. It can shift from happiness to madness in a few sentences, yet still feel believable. Strangely, I have never seen an OP more opposite to the tone and theme of the series. Love the song, but it is far too cheerful.

Story – High

A bartender judges whether the dead deserve another life or the void by observing their decisions during pub games. An engaging look at the human condition and life’s choices, save for a couple of episodes.

Overall Quality – Very High

Recommendation: Must watch. Insightful, tense, and conflict-driven, Death Parade is necessary for any anime fan. Note: While Death Billiards (the proof of concept for Death Parade) arrived first, watch it after the series, as it’s merely a weaker substitute to the first episode.

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Awards: (hover mouse over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:

Engaging DialogueExtensive Character DevelopmentFluid AnimationStellar Voice ActingStrong Support Characters

Negative: None