Category Archives: Comedy

Good for laughs. This tag only applies to shows that have consistent attempts at humour or are particularly funny.

Cells at Work! – Anime Review

Cells at Work! – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Hataraku Saibou

 

Related: Cells at Work – Season 2

Similar: Hetalia Axis Powers

Dr Stone

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Comedy

Length: 13 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Brilliant teaching show
  • Cell personifications couldn’t be more anime

Negatives:

  • Not much in the way of story

(Request an anime for review here.)

Are you someone who can name 100s of Pokémon or every piece of equipment in your favourite RPG, yet can’t remember 10 maths formulas come exam time? You’re not alone! It’s because your class didn’t teach you maths in an engaging way that links the formulas to a piece of “story”. In Pokémon, you remember those in your team (main story), some you remember for being everywhere or annoying like Zubat (story repetition), others for being rare (story highlight), and some for an event unique to you (that close battle, that one you caught with your final Pokeball, that one you didn’t know was in the game until a random encounter). Their impact in the story forms a lasting memory. Where is the story when a teacher rattles off a maths formula as your chin slides down your palm before your head hits the desk in sleep?

Cells at Work takes the story approach to teaching kids (adults welcome too) about cells in the human body. We follow a red blood cell as she goes about her job of delivering oxygen to different parts of the human body – if she can get there of course, given her atrocious sense of direction. She encounters various afflictions and injuries that plague the body, which requires the aid of other cell types. A regular is the white blood cell (no one has a name) whose purpose is to massacre foreign invaders.

I love the animefication of the cells. Red cells are dressed as Japanese delivery workers, macrophages – “cleaners” of the body that capture invaders to study them and activate defences – are friendly maids with blades under their dresses, and bacteria are monsters. Platelets, the young cells that clot wounds to begin healing, are little girls manning construction sites. Simply adorable. And the way white blood cells are calm and friendly at most times, but turn into bloodthirsty killers the moment they sense enemies. Love it. The designs of these characters educate, even on a subconscious level, of their purpose.

Everything goes full anime here. When a naïve T cell matures, it evolves from a wimpy kid into All Might. Battles between white blood cells and bacteria are outright anime brawls. The worst of the viruses are Dragon Ball Z-like villains. The cancer episode is rather terrifying. It’s great.

Best of all, Cells at Work does all of this in an entertaining way without sacrificing education. This is such an easy anime to watch. You could binge this start to finish. That said, if you ignore the educational side for a moment, the episodic stories are as basic as you can get. Yes, there are a few twists – what they thought was one virus turns out to be a different more dangerous one instead, for example – and there is proper story structure, but it’s nothing special. If you aren’t interested in the concept of learning about cells through anime, this probably won’t engage you.

If you want to get the most out of Cells at Work, I highly recommend watching Dr Hope’s commentary on each episode, where he explains the concepts in detail and talks to the accuracy of the science. I discovered the anime through him. Here is a playlist starting at the first episode:

Art – Medium

The anime representations of cells in the human body are perfect and recognisable. While Cells at Work looks good overall, you can see budget constraints in the flat colouring of many scenes and often plain environments.

Sound – High

Cells at Work manages to educate the audience in an interesting manner and still deliver a coherent script. The acting is great too – real veterans amongst the cast.

Story – Medium

Explore the functions of various cells in the human body through animefication! The informative aspect of the story is great, but the actual in episode stories are basic. You won’t remember them beyond the macro level.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: For those who want to learn through fun. Cells at Work, seen purely as a story anime, isn’t anything special. However, approach it from an educational perspective and it’s a ton of fun. Also watch Dr Hope commentary videos afterwards!

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: None

Negative: None

Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai!

 

Similar: The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

Toradora

Another

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Comedy Drama Slice of Life

Length: 13 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Colourful, poppy animation
  • Good laughs
  • Works in the drama well

Negatives:

  • Nothing special above the rest

(Request an anime for review here.)

Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions is an anime that came off my abandoned list because a reader requested it for review. I had abandoned seeing this after judging it by the cover, for it has a character design type that I hate: the eye patch girl. You have no idea how much I hate that design. In particular, I hate the medical eye patch. I first encountered it in Ikki Tousen, a fighting anime featuring one such eye patch girl that has her clothes torn every fight. Wanted her to die.

I hate it because it doesn’t make any sense that they wear it all the time – medically irresponsible, even! It’s like those shounen characters with a band aid, usually across the nose. At some point, it has to come off. If you need a permanent eye patch, then get a proper one. The medical one just screams try hard of the lowest order and I have this irrational hatred of it. Before this turns into a full-blown rant about eye patches, I should start the actual review.

Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions takes the eye patch design and mocks it for the pathetic tacky fashion statement that it is. Yuuta is trying to escape his middle school past as a “chunibyo” called the “Dark Flame Master”. A chunibyo is the sort to believe that retaining your virginity until 30 turns you into a wizard. He fancied himself a fantasy hero. He was a LARPer who took it a bit too literally. No matter. He’s now in high school, where nobody knows of his dark secret. Time for a new leaf. In comes Rikka to ruin all that!

She is a magician of some renown and power, possessing the “Wicked Eye” that could unravel one’s destiny. Or so she believes. So dangerous is her eye that she covers it with an eye patch.

Try as he might, Yuuta can’t escape her delusions, aided by other classmates that join her magic circle and drag him back to chunibyo hell. The Dark Flame Master rises once more!

I find her a great character from the first episode when he sees her at the train station. The way she pretends to use the Force to open automated train doors and her smug strut on board that follows is simply a perfect introduction to the character. It isn’t long before the eye patch makes sense in completing her farcical appearance. This girl, whom I once hated based on appearance alone, is a delight to be around. My favourite scenes have to be those between her and her sister.

Her sister indulges the delusions on occasion, manifesting as epic duels of magic and comically oversized weapons (I love the cutaway to reality that shows them just smacking each other with an umbrella and ladle). The comedic timing is great throughout the series.

Chunibyo isn’t comedy all the way, however, as it introduces the drama at the heart of Rikka’s condition. Normally, this is where I would tell you that the story goes to crap while the writers try to force some emotion down your throats at the last minute. We’ve seen it time and time again in comedy anime, as though the writer is afraid that if the series doesn’t end with a gut punch, no one will take it seriously. They seem insecure in their comedy. But for Chunibyo, this isn’t the case.

First, it doesn’t bring this out of nowhere for the finale. We see hints of it from the first episode before the midpoint brings it to the forefront and the final act hammers it home. It explores the reason behind her chunibyo condition and her belief that if she can get strong, find just the right spell, she can see beyond the boundary of reality into another realm where her father has gone. It’s a clever way of explaining her character and giving her more depth than expected.

Now Yuuta, he’s rather flat. He works as a compliment to her craziness, but you never get the sense that he is a character beyond this story. He’s fine. I find the supporting cast more entertaining, particularly the girl who believes she wields the power of Mjolnir in her twin tails. I felt so sorry for her at the end.

Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions is one of the comedy dramas that manages to end on a satisfying note. Sure, it doesn’t elevate itself to some unmissable masterpiece, yet at no point did I deem it a bad show. It is an enjoyable ride from start to finish. And the eye patch didn’t suck.

Art – High

More animation went into this anime than what was needed, which is appreciated. It allows the fantasies to come to life and lively characters to shine.

Sound – Medium

Neither the music nor script are anything to write home about, though they aren’t bad at all. The acting is the strongest element in the audio department.

Story – Medium

A girl who uses fantasies to escape from reality drags those around her into a world of everyday chaos. This simple plot manages to balance comedy and drama to deliver a satisfying, if predicable, anime.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: Try it. Love, Chunibyo & Other Delusions is better than I expected and you may think so too.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: None

Negative: None

Kaguya-sama: Love is War – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Kaguya-sama wa Kokurasetai: Tensai-tachi no Renai Zunousen

 

Related: Kaguya-sama: Love is War season 2

Similar: Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun

Maid-sama

Skilled Teaser Takagi

 

Watched in: Japanese

Genre: Romance Comedy

Length: 12 episodes

 

Positives:

  • All characters are great fun
  • Visual creativity makes paying attention worthwhile
  • Defies genre norms
  • Top tier opening song and sequence

Negatives:

  • Lacks a strong finish, even for a season

(Request an anime for review here.)

Kaguya-sama Love is War is the perfect antidote anime to watch after Naruto’s Great Ninja War. What an uplifting show. Contrary to the violent title, Love is War fills one with joy at the comedic antics of these lovers in denial. It follows two students so competitive in nature that neither is willing to make the first move in their relationship, a relationship they aren’t even aware of.

He, Miyuki, is of a poor background and notoriously stingy, but is also the top student in school and holds the position of council president. She, Kaguya, is of a family so wealthy that it rains money on their estate and she’s an excellent student, though still second to him. They are the perfect couple. Everyone knows it except for them.

What starts as a heated rivalry, where both parties do everything in their power to force the other side to make the first move in any minor dispute, soon turns into a stubborn romance. These two lock horns more than competing bighorn rams. Remember that thing you used to do as a kid where you and another kid are holding something, and you refuse to let go because it means you lose. Lose what exactly? Nothing. Letting go first means you lose, and losing is unacceptable. These two are like that about everything. And I love them for it.

I had low expectations going into Love is War. A high school rom-com about a couple that refuses to communicate? Conflict created by a lack of communication in romance is one of the worst tropes. However, taking that trope to a comical extreme morphs the conflict from eye gouging stupidity to sidesplitting hilarity.

One episode has them arguing over where the council should go for an excursion: beach or mountains. He insists on the camping in the mountains – much more romantic (the astronomic wordplay in his fantasy of how she will finally break and confess is priceless). She insists on the beach – he will see her in a swimsuit and confess immediately! Back and forth, back and forth they go, refusing to budge. Then he’s reminded of bugs, something he can’t stand, and is about to change sides when Fujiwara, student council secretary, airily mentions that if they are to go to the beach, she will need a new swimsuit since she has grown in the last year. This reminds Kaguya of her own flat chest – of course Miyuki will fall for those bouncing fun bags! Change of plan: Kaguya is now pro-mountain! They swap sides and the stalemate continues.

It’s just great. Every episode had me laughing. Furthermore, the structure of having three scenarios per episode keeps the pace moving at a clip where no joke drags. If this had been adapted a decade ago, they would have stretched a scene per episode and killed the humour. This is the ideal format.

Speaking of Fujiwara earlier, she is another defiance of the genre. Well before a dear reader requested Love is War for review, I had seen memes about this character as well as her ending dance. Didn’t know which anime she came from. My impression was of that overly cutesy but actually annoying side character from every high school anime. Turns out the fan content didn’t do her justice. To my surprise, she is a fun lovable character within that archetype. She’s the version done correctly. The side story where a ramen snob takes her for some ramen normie because of her ditzy countenance is perfect. Never has eating ramen been such serious business. I loved her within one episode.

I can say as much about any of the main trio. On paper, they are the clichés you have seen many times before, yet they are almost the opposite of one’s expectations in practice.

A key ingredient in making this simple premise work so well is the relatability of the characters’ personal conflicts. He has many jokes related to being poor; she has plenty related to a rich and sheltered upbringing. For instance, she had such a sanitised childhood that children’s slang for penis, like “wiener”, has her rolling on the floor as the most vulgar thing she’s ever heard. I used to be like that (I wasn’t rich – just raised in a different society), though one wouldn’t know it looking at me now. As outlandish as these scenes are, there is a relatable core to each of them. You can witness their turmoil and say, “That’s like me!” or “I have a friend like that.” These characters have genuine weaknesses that work to the theme and fun conflict of the narrative.

Love is War is an anime type of anime but doesn’t simply throw whatever random nonsense at you in the hopes that something sticks, relying on you going, “It’s random, but that’s just crazy Japan, I guess, so it must be genius.”

If I have to give you a flaw in this series, it would be the ending. It near falls into that trap seen in 90% of anime romantic comedies. The serious final episode. You know what I’m talking about. The series so far has been comedy every minute of the way untroubled by serious drama, but then as if to inject depth (which it never needs), the comedy loses all humour in favour of drama that tries to make you feel something. Most anime comedies that avoid this do so by having no ending at all. Not ideal either. Love is War, thankfully, doesn’t go full drama. Episode 12 is still funny. But it breaks structure for a dramatic narrative that doesn’t even pay off. It offers no progression, as it needs to keep the battle going. A bloody fake out. We end on the weakest episode.

There is another season on the way in 2020, which, if it is the end, hopefully delivers a better conclusion. There is every chance that this next season could bump Kaguya-sama Love is War to my highest rating tier. I find plenty to love here. The characters, including the supporting cast, the humour, the romance, the conflict, and the visual flair are all so much fun!

Art – High

On premise, this sort of anime would sport bland visuals, as seen in My Teen Romantic Comedy SNAFU. Having no fantastical elements often results in a series with nothing worth looking at. Love is War is the opposite. It employs creative visual compositions and techniques to keep your eyes on the screen.

Sound – Very High

Fantastic script. Fantastic acting. The main three in particular play so well off each other. Love the narrator too. They even managed to hire someone who can speak good French to play a French character. Miracle! And as if that wasn’t enough, Love is War has quite likely my favourite opening song of 2019.

Story – High

Two students that like each other refuse to be the first to admit their feelings. A fun ride throughout that only lacks a strong finish, which the next season may fix.

Overall Quality – High

Recommendation: Watch it. Kaguya-sama: Love is War is so much fun that I would hate for you to miss out.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: 

CharmGreat OP or ED SequenceHilariousStellar Voice Acting

Negative: None

Drifters – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Drifters

 

Similar: Hellsing Ultimate

Fate/Zero

Re:Creators

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Historical Action Comedy Fantasy

Length: 12 episodes, 3 OVA

 

Positives:

  • Harsh visual style
  • Effort in the fantasy and samurai speech mannerisms

Negatives:

  • Constant random humour is jarring
  • Unfortunate use of CG
  • No profiling for elf ears

(Request an anime for review here.)

I loved Drifters for about one episode. The distinct visual style, gritty action, and commitment to bloodlust had me sold. Then the comedy started and I recoiled in disgust. Why? Why do this to me?

Drifters opens in the midst of a clash between samurai armies during the Battle of Sekigahara, year 1600. Bodies litter the muddy fields as screams echo through the trees. Amongst this carnage stands Toyohisa, blood crazed and hungry for battle. Upon spotting an enemy commander, he charges the cavalry line as one soldier against many. This foolhardy act goes as well as expected and he finds himself on the receiving end of a dozen spears. He cuts down several enemies before oblivion takes hold.

However, instead of the afterlife, a white corridor lined with doors and a solitary office clerk awaits him. At a mere gesture from the clerk, one of these doors opens and sucks Toyohisa to another world, a world where knights of the human Orte Empire reap the land and oppress other races such as elves and dwarves. Toyohisa, almost involuntarily, comes to the aid of elves and makes it his mission to free them of tyranny. The fact that he gets to wage war and taste more blood is a coincidence. It should be an easy matter, after all, with his superior combat prowess and the famed Nobunaga – also ripped from his time alongside other historical figures – on this team. He didn’t anticipate that whatever supernatural being the clerk was fighting against would summon fighters of his own. Nor did he anticipate they would be so twisted by malice at the manner of their deaths that they developed powers beyond imagining.

If you told me all of the above, I would say, “Sold! I will watch Drifters.” What you would have failed to mention was the damned humour.

Have you seen Hellsing Ultimate (same manga author as Drifters)? Remember those jarring cuts to comedy in a caricature art style that punched all dramatic tension out of your gut? Remember how the few times they used it in Hellsing was bad enough? Yeah, well, now imagine it first happening once an episode, then once an act, until is ramps up to once per scene and more. If you haven’t seen the like before, I want you to imagine cartoon sound effects added to any dramatic scene you like. It is intolerable.

I cannot impress upon you enough how much they overuse this technique. How is anyone supposed to take the slaughter of innocent elves seriously when it’s going to cut to Nobunaga honking some woman’s boobs at any moment? That joke makes an appearance once per episode – at least – after the woman joins the party. Joan of Arc is on fire, literally, in perpetuity out of spite for how the Church betrayed and burned her alive. She now has the power to incinerate others. But that isn’t as important as using the same moronic cut away reaction as last episode. The opener doesn’t give any indication of this.

One could improve Drifters by simply editing out these cuts. It wouldn’t be difficult either because they are almost forgotten when we return to the actual scene. The only humour that made me laugh was Toyohisa telling Nobunaga what happened to Japan and his legacy after his death.

This negative was enough of a detractor to me that I was sick of Drifters halfway through. I found it so bad that the stylish action, harsh visuals, and even the introduction of many interesting historical figures bringing their specialities to the battlefield barely made a difference. I mean, a WWII pilot joins mid battle amongst a squad of real dragons. If a meeting of Nobunaga, Hannibal, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Rasputin, Joan of Arc, Anastasia Romanova, and the machinations of Adolf God Damn Hitler can’t save a series, nothing can.

The action is good in all of its gory stylishness and insanity. But that unfunny humour every damn time! Look, I need to stop here before I think of it any further and dwell on how it ruined a fun action series.

Art – Medium

I am torn on Drifter’s art. On one hand, I love the harsh style, thick outlines, and high contrast shadows. On the other hand, I hate the CG characters (crowds, I can understand, but principal characters?) and how lazy the art is come characters in profile. It’s most noticeable with the elves’ ears – they look the same from the front and side, which is goofy.

Sound – High

In contrast to the low effort of the elf ears, their fictional language is well done. You feel like you can understand it, though not quite. Similarly, the samurai era speech (or a good representation of it) imitates the serious and forceful mannerisms of samurai films. And the OP is dope as hell. The real letdown is the poor timing and overuse of random comedy in the script.

Story – Low

Various historical figures find themselves dragged into a fantasy world to fight a war for supernatural beings. A fun concept brought down by insisting we suffer through lame comedy every five seconds.

Overall Quality – Low

Recommendation: For action fans only. Drifters is a lot of fun and would be an easy recommendation if not for the bad humour.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive:  None

Negative:

Not Funny

Astro Fighter Sunred – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Tentai Senshi Sunred

 

Similar: One-Punch Man

Gintama

Detroit Metal City

Pop Team Epic

 

Watched in: Japanese

Genre: Comedy

Length: 52 episodes (half-length each)

 

Positives:

  • The peculiar sense of humour.

Negatives:

  • Narrow appeal.
  • The art is on a negative budget.

(Request an anime for review here.)

Take the Red Ranger from Power Rangers, make him an arse leeching off his girlfriend and surround him with a muscled chicken, two Team Rocket grunts, a werewolf, the creature from the black lagoon, mecha rabbit, and Galactus. With all this combined, you have Astro Fighter Sunred. It’s the humour of One-Punch Man mixed with the Justice Friends from Dexter’s Laboratory, and structured as poorly (or as brilliantly) as Pop Team Epic.

What an odd anime.

Astro Fighter Sunred is a retired superhero story in the vein of One-Punch Man and The Incredibles, only more vulgar and animated far more poorly. Sunred is a bum, while the evil villain is really a grandmother whose greatest worries are about cleaning up after his minions.

Each episode consists of several shorts of varying lengths. As alluded to by the Pop Team Epic comparison, anything goes. Sometimes it’s a cooking show with the lamest recipes, at other times it’s a slapstick cartoon.

I don’t have much to say on this one. It’s one of those anime where you need to see it to understand what I mean. (You can find it on YouTube, I believe.)

This is a peculiar kind of humour for a much older generation. It’s parodying anime most of us have barely heard of. If you are part of the target audience, this may be the most hilarious thing you have ever seen. For everyone else though, I think it takes too much “effort” to figure out the references for a show meant to be dumb simple fun.

Art – Low

Technically, the art sucks. However, it does save itself from the pits by working with the style of humour, similar to how King of the Hill is a fit to its sensibilities. It’s clear many characters weak masks to avoid mouth animations.

Sound – Medium

The acting is quite good – nothing great, but serviceable to the script, which itself is snappy as it rolls from one joke into the next.

Story – Medium

A superhero bickers with his arch nemesis, a motherly fellow surrounded by his sensitive minions, as they stave off everyday life. The overall story lacks direction, but the episodic scenarios are a humorous little exploits.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: Try it. One episode. One episode – less even – is all you need to know if Astro Fighter Sunred’s peculiar humour is to your taste. It probably won’t be, yet you won’t know until you try.

(Request reviews here. Find out more about the rating system here.)

 

Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: None

Negative: None