Le Chevalier D’Eon – Anime Review

Japanese Title: Le Chevalier D’Eon

 

Similar: Gankutsuou: The Count of Monte Cristo

The Rose of Versailles

Trinity Blood

 

Watched in: Japanese & English

Genre: Historical Supernatural Mystery

Length: 24 episodes

 

Positives:

  • Looks like France.
  • Animation succeeds in impactful sword strikes.

Negatives:

  • Script is inauthentic to the period.
  • So bland.

(Request an anime for review here.)

I love historical pieces. I particularly love it when anime takes a crack at it in a non-Japanese setting. Gankutsuou and The Rose of Versailles are two of my favourite anime, both based on historical France, interestingly enough (France is the favourite foreign county amongst the Japanese). Le Chevalier D’Eon, set in 18th century France during the reign of Louis XV, is another such historical anime. I saw middling reviews for this one and hoped, as I always do with anime outside the popular genres, that the reviews came down to it simply not being a fit for popular preference. While that is somewhat the case here, D’Eon still isn’t great.

Lia de Beaumont, favourite of the nobility including the king himself, floats down the river with her veins full of mercury and blood scribbles on her dead body. Her brother Charles d’Éon de Beaumont, spy and knight to the king, makes it his mission to find the truth of her death. This single murder soon unravels into a plot against France. However, the greatest twist in this tale comes from Lia herself. Her spirit, unable to crossover, returns to the living and inhabits d’Éon’s body. With her combat prowess and his espionage abilities, they plunge into a world of the dead and the treacherous.

I can best describe Le Chevalier D’Eon as a Three Musketeers tale with a dark supernatural angle instead of the usual fun swashbuckling. Many people die, blood splatters ceilings, zombies (called gargoyles here) rise from the dead, and ritual sacrifice of beautiful women is in high fashion.

The immediate issue is how this story fails to grip you from the beginning. Lia’s spirit possessing d’Éon is an interesting twist for a story that gives no indication of being anything but an authentic(ish) historical piece until that point, but the grander conspiracy isn’t clear for several episodes. It doesn’t give much reason to care. I would have started the story with the focus just on Lia’s death. Make it seem like an isolated incident personal to the protagonist, though nothing of greater import. Then, once he seems close to solving the case, he learns this is much bigger than a single death. Now we are in for a ride.

What we have is too vague. “Something is going on – can you give me more detail?”

“Nah, I don’t feel like it.”

If a writer holds back every little detail for so long, then one needs to draw in the audience with another element. And in a historical piece, the easy answer is through atmosphere and authenticity – transport the audience to 18th century France. Make us walk the bustling streets, catch the scent of a bakery around the corner and feel the chill in the air. Le Chevalier D’Eon looks like France, but doesn’t feel like it. The script in particular has no historical touches. Now, the characters haven’t come straight out of My Hero Academia or say, “That is wack, yo!” yet they don’t sound of their time.

I would go so far as to say that had they gone more authentic in every aspect, it would have inverted my opinion on the series. See, in order to convey more of the politics, society, manners, and life of 18th century France, they would need to cut scenes to make room. And what would they likely cut? The boring scenes. Only the action feels strong.

I can forgive a story not paying much attention to authenticity as long as it’s entertaining – several Robin Hood films come to mind. Sadly, that won’t apply here. The pacing is too slow, the conspiracy, even once rolling, doesn’t hold you tight like a beggar on the streets of Paris saves for a few scenes, and the characters never flourish.

On the flipside, some of the historical story details are great. Take the siblings, for example. D’Éon – or if you want his full name of Charles-Geneviève-Louis-Auguste-André-Timothée d’Éon de Beaumont – was a real person and a real spy for France who disguised himself as a woman – one Lia de Beaumont. He was apparently so convincing that people had no idea he was a man for years. His life was truly fascinating. I love how this anime takes his identities and works them into the supernatural.

If only the execution were better.

Le Chevalier D’Eon will likely only draw the attention of history fans. Such fans though love the details that this anime is lacking. Go for The Rose of Versailles instead.

Art – Medium

The art would be rated higher if not for the muddy backgrounds and blurring of detail. It feels like they tried to emulate a Renaissance painter’s style by using a Photoshop filter sometimes. I’m just grateful they didn’t copy the manga’s art. Action feels good thanks to weighty animations.

Sound – Medium

The acting is good. However, the script makes little effort to sound period accurate, which is a critical factor in the success of a period piece.

Story – Medium

A knight of France takes in the spirit of his powerful sister to uncover who murdered her and reveal what secret threatens the nation. The story is in dire need of an editor to sharpen the corners and tighten the edges so that it may bring out the potential.

Overall Quality – Medium

Recommendation: For history fans only. I don’t know if I would even recommend Le Chevalier D’Eon to history fans when it doesn’t feel historical enough. It may not bother you though.

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Awards: (hover over each award to see descriptions; click award for more recipients)

Positive: None

Negative: None

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